Letter O for Old’s Maid Puzzle/ AtoZ 2019

The April A to Z Challenge is in its tenth year, I’ve now participated for 6 of those years, and this year will be my 3rd quilt theme. It’s my first quilt using only patterns from the Kansas City Star newspaper archives. Welcome to my blog!

This is an old-time favorite for sure! Changing quilt color choices, block direction, or sashing can give you some variations with this one that make it a popular quilt choice. As you can see in the right hand photo, they recommend Pink, Blue and White.But the finished quilt on the right is in deep reds with gray and set on a white background. They are also set on point if you zoom in close and examine it.

I went with the scrap bin in my decision-making. Hopefully I’m using enough variation in colors to create a nice end result. So far, most all my coloring used during this AtoZ quilt creation is in the blue and red shades with a little dash of yellow here and there.

Proud moment when I actually got the stripes set in the way I wanted. I most likely would not go to so much effort in a whole quilt with this block to be perfectly honest. For me, quilting is to be kept stress free. As it should be 🙂

Did You Know?

I was perusing the news of 1928 and found it kind of funny that in this year, the first Home Pregnancy Test was introduced. And at the same time Lady Chatterley’s Lover is banned for being too explicit in the United States and England. For even more fun I’m going to name a few famous women born in 1928. None were Old Maids either. Anne Sexton (poet) –Shirley Temple (actress) — Etta James (singer) –Barbara Lang (actress/pin-up model)

Come back here tomorrow for another quilt block for the A to Z Challenge! Also be sure to visit the home of the A to Z here and see other entrants challenge posts. There are excellent writers participating every year with topics in whatever you’re interested in

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Letter N for Name on Each Friendship/ AtoZ 2019

The April A to Z Challenge is in its tenth year, I’ve now participated for 6 of those years, and this year will be my 3rd quilt theme. It’s my first quilt using only patterns from the Kansas City Star newspaper archives. Welcome to my blog!

Another signature block for this AtoZ quilt was just what I needed. You can’t have too much writing on a quilt when you want it to memorialize something. Just don’t ask me what I’ll be writing on the block at this particular moment. Time will tell. I have to say I like the ’56 version with the star points better than I do the redraft version on the left.

I decided to show some corrections I had to make. You can see in my layout photo on the right that I had it correct, but when sewing, I turned a couple sections wrong and ended up spending some time with my beloved seam ripper.

Name On Each Friendship complete
Name On Each Friendship complete

All’s well in the end result for this block. It even measured the correct 12 inches.

Did You Know?

The Star and Elvis spilled the beans on a young Elvis fan on May 25, 1956. According to the article, a teenager snuck out of the house to see him in concert. Being convinced she’d gotten by with it was short-lived however. Served to her on her breakfast plate the next morning was a copy of the Kansas City Star with her picture on the front page.

Come back here tomorrow for another quilt block for the A to Z Challenge! Also be sure to visit the home of the A to Z here and see other entrants challenge posts. There are excellent writers participating every year with topics in whatever you’re interested in

Letter K for Flying Kite/AtoZ 2019

The April A to Z Challenge is in its tenth year, I’ve now participated for 6 of those years, and this year will be my 3rd quilt theme. It’s my first quilt using only patterns from the Kansas City Star newspaper archives. Welcome to my blog!

From Star Quilts book
From Star Quilts book

In 1937 Flying was a pretty big part of the news with Amelia Earhart, the Hindenburgh and Jacqueline Cochran (who set a national speed record for women). Why not create a quilt block called Flying Kite?!

Confession time…I went shopping with mom and in a big way. A local store (fabric store) went out of business after the owner passed away and a couple fabrics you see here were fat quarters, not scraps. Sigh. Couldn’t help it. Sometimes a girl has to go for the bargains.

And who can pass up a great sale?

If you like pinwheels, this is a spinner variety you should love.
If you like pinwheels, this is a spinner variety you should love.

Did You Know?

So on the topic of sales, in 1937 I thought I’d share the cost of living for some things.

  • New House $4,100
  • Yearly wages average $1780
  • Gallon of gas 10 cents
  • Loaf of bread 9 cents
  • New car $760

Come back here tomorrow for another quilt block for the A to Z Challenge! Also be sure to visit the home of the A to Z here and see other entrants challenge posts. There are excellent writers participating every year with topics in whatever you’re interested in

Letter F for Farmer’s Daughter/ AtoZ 2019

The April A to Z Challenge is in its tenth year, I’ve now participated for 6 of those years, and this year will be my 3rd quilt theme. It’s my first quilt using only patterns from the Kansas City Star newspaper archives. Welcome to my blog!

Did You Know?

In 1935, the Great Depression as well as the event known as the Dust Bowl were in full swing and we weren’t aware we’d made the halfway point here in the MidWest. You don’t hear a lot about my native Missouri and the Dust Bowl, but according to some old-timers I’ve known, we felt the repercussions plenty. Just to give you a little idea of the land value for typical Missouri acreage, I’ve looked at the University of Missouri’s stats and here is how the following years compared:

  • 1920 — An acre valued at $88.
  • 1935 — Same acre valued at $33

The Farmer’s Daughter quilt block is one of the blocks featured in the 1935 Kansas City Star and I’m pretty sure farming was the hottest topic in the MidWest at that time with the future of this vocation in severe dire straits. Kudos to all the quilters of that time trying to keep their chins up by staying creative with their needles and thread.

Lots of color variations possible with this one
Lots of color variations possible with this one

This quilt is about as good as it gets for me personally. Cut, sewn, pressed and it even measured the correct 12-ish inches (You have to allow for those seam allowances as well as squaring up the blocks.) Here’s a little gallery of pics on a portion of the block construction.

Not hard, great for using up scraps and versatile. Can’t ask for more.

Farmer's Daughter Complete
Farmer’s Daughter Complete

Come back here tomorrow for another quilt block for the A to Z Challenge! Also be sure to visit the home of the A to Z here and see other entrants challenge posts. There are excellent writers participating every year with topics in whatever you’re interested in.

Letter E for Envelope/AtoZ 2019

The April A to Z Challenge is in its tenth year, I’ve now participated for 6 of those years, and this year will be my 3rd quilt theme. It’s my first quilt using only patterns from the Kansas City Star newspaper archives. Welcome to my blog!

This quilt block resembles others in its center square surrounded by lots of triangles and one really has to dissect it mentally to get an envelope shape to come to mind. I hope you can see the intended shape. These days, when you search for an envelope block, you get something like this:

Envelope block from AtoZ 2017

But back in 1942, the block was not as defined let’s just say. But I did like making it.

It’s here that I need to insert another frustration. Seems like frustration is the real theme this year for my A to Z.

Under this stash is the Envelope Block

Yet another Huge block has been added to my assemblage. This one measured a whopping 16 inches. I just have to laugh at this point. We have 12, 14 and 16 inch blocks. What will the future hold? Stay tuned…..

Envelope Complete

Gonna make lemonade with the lemons I’ve decided. There is a way thank heaven!

Did You Know?

More letters were written on Sundays than any other days during WWII. Gpa’s letter is a perfect example.

Dated Sunday, December 6, 1942. From Glenn to Inez Hunter

Come back here tomorrow for another quilt block for the A to Z Challenge! Also be sure to visit the home of the A to Z here and see other entrants challenge posts. There are excellent writers participating every year with topics in whatever you’re interested in.

Letter C for Contrary Husband/ AtoZ 2019

The April A to Z Challenge is in its tenth year, I’ve now participated for 6 of those years, and this year will be my 3rd quilt theme. It’s my first quilt using only patterns from the Kansas City Star newspaper archives. Welcome to my blog!

Contrary is defined as being incompatible. Sewing inset seams is about as incompatible as it gets for me personally in quilting. Being an early childhood professional, the book Green Eggs and Ham comes to mind. “I do not like inset seams Sam I am.” Well you know the rest. Distasteful. I’ll keep trying though because I really want them finished nicely.

Star Book pattern photographed with my cellphone camera.
As shown in the Star Quilt book

It’s only a few pieces to sew so that helped. Some. The other help came from a very warm iron. No quilt is going to turn out well without ironing. It’s an honest to goodness fact.

Contrary Husband Completed
Contrary Husband Completed

Ta Da! That’s as good as it’ll get folks. Seasoned quilters will see my flub-up, but I’m just going to live with it. Just let me add that the book had no examples of vintage Contrary Husband quilts. chuckling to myself… There’s a reason that this pattern published in 1938 said “it will cause conversation”.

Did You Know?

Speaking of causing conversation, the infamous Missouri State Penitentiary housed Adam Richetti, accomplice to Pretty Boy Floyd and in 1938, he found his end in the gas chambers of this prison. His crime: killing a federal agent, a McAlester, Oklahoma police chief and 2 Kansas City officers. Named the Kansas City, Missouri Union Station Murderers.

Come back here tomorrow for another quilt block for the A to Z Challenge! Also be sure to visit the home of the A to Z here and see other entrants challenge posts. There are excellent writers participating every year with topics in whatever you’re interested in.

Theme Reveal 2019/A to Z Blog Challenge

I’m doing it again. I’ve joined up with the April A to Z Blog Challenge for my 6th consecutive year. And for the 3rd year in a row, you’ll get to watch a quilt unfold.

The Kansas City Star's most recent home, right off I-70 in downtown Kansas City, Missouri
The Kansas City Star’s most recent home, right off I-70 in downtown Kansas City, Missouri

I’ve been inspired this time by a drive-by of the Kansas City Star building in Kansas City, Missouri. Many of you may not know that this newspaper was world reknowned for it’s weekly quilt block publication beginning in the late 1920’s. I’m not giving up too much more about that until Challenge time, but just know, I’ll strictly be using blocks previously published in the KC Star.

If you’re a fellow blogger, welcome to this madness we call a Challenge. If you’re just dropping in, maybe you’ll check back on April 1 (no foolin’) and see what all the fuss is all about. You can click here for other theme reveals, a list of the participants, or to join up. You have until March 28 for the theme reveal posts, and sign up closes April 6. But you can read all the instructions by clicking here.

Thanks to our hosts again this year and know you are greatly appreciated. Thanks to my readers. And especially thank you to my family who endure and support my fabric creations.

Let the fun begin!!