The Silos at Prairie Vale/Thursday Doors

Hay rake wheel over the door of this silo suite.

There are a few well-kept secrets here in Mid-Missouri, but it’s high time I spilled the beans. I am super excited to introduce a couple friends of mine. They are Wendy and Doug Needy and they have created ‘The Silos at Prarie Vale’. This Airbnb rendevous on the Prairie is a gem! Tucked away in Rural Pettis County, Missouri–near Windsor’s Amish community, the Missouri State Fairgrounds, state parks, annual festivals and historical places. Who needs to stay here? Honeymooners, Fair-goers, World Travelers, Bikers (it’s a short pedal off the Katy Trail) or anyone who needs to destress their life. What an experience!!

Yeah, I know. This sounds like an ad. But I know these folks. I graduated with Doug. His mother, Judy, graduated with my aunt Glenda. Growing up, those 2 spent lots of hours as our room mothers, preparing cool parties for us. So many good treats and wonderful memories. And when I first met Wendy, we were planning one of our class reunions. Judging by the hard work and thoughtfulness they’ve invested in this venture I’d say creativity is just in their genes.

This Thursday Doors, I hope you’ll enjoy the selection of photos Wendy sent me. They will tell you so much more than I can. If you are interested in a more detailed description of The Silos, please click here.

Thanks to Norm 2.0 and all the Doors family who are so kind as to allow me to have this brag moment for one of Green Ridge, Missouri’s finest families. Please visit Norm 2.0 and find the blue frog button for door entries from across the globe. You will be awestruck by the superb views.

Searching for Red/ Thursday Doors

Digging through the archives this week led me to some Red that will, once again, cover the Red prompt for today on Instagram and the Thursday Doors. Some unplanned time off led me down this road and I hope to be back on my photo-taking binges very soon.

To see other Thursday Doors entries, stop by Norm 2.0 and scroll down to the blue frog and click. You’ll see wonderful door posts from around the world.

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The red is pretty washed out here, but it’s hanging in there. No snow currently in Missouri at this time. But I do remember trick-or-treating in snow!

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Slightly more red and all doors seem to be present and accounted for.

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Devoid of doors as far as I can tell. But the red is definitely showing best in my 3rd choice.

A little blast from the past since we’re on the topic of farms from “The History of Pettis County, Missouri 1882”

The first crops were principally corn. Oats, wheat, hemp, flax and rye were raised. The tame grasses were not cultivated. The wild grass was considered good for all stock and hundreds of tons of prairie hay were annually mown by hand and stacked for the winter feed. At an early day spring and fall wheat were both tried. The smut and the accumulation of chintz bugs on spring wheat early convinced the farmers of this section that it was an unprofitable crop. Fall wheat, although not extensively raised, has generally done well. With the early farmers, corn was the staple product, and became the staff of life for man and beast, and the failure of the corn crop brought almost a famine. On corn, the hardy settlers depended for Johnny cake, hominy, hasty pudding, and succotash. Corn was the principal feed for horses, swine, cattle, and sheep. In the early autumn, just as soon as the ears had sufficiently ripened, the farmer with his wife and family entered the corn field, and stripped the blades from the ear down, after which they were cured, bound into bundles, and stacked as provender for winter use. The tops of the stalks were cut above the ear, bound into bundles and shocked for the cattle.

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Connected

Recently my Aunt Maybelle left me with a family memento. She is well-known in our family as the “family geneologist” so I felt pretty thrilled to be the recipient of her generosity.

Somehow I missed getting a pic of the outside of the book, but here’s some valid info of the subject, copyright and who it belonged to….. my grandpa. He was the epitomy of farmer in his Osh Kosh overalls and hat. Not surprised he would have had a book like this one.

Just some pages I found interesting. Some survivalists are drooling right now 😉

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Me? I’m just bragging right now about how tall my peas have grown this year. And this was over a week ago. They’re nearly to the top of those trellis’s! Kind of feeling connected to my farming roots about now.

For other entries in today’s Daily Prompt ‘Connected’, click here.