To Dr. Alex/ Inez’s Clippings

Kate Douglas Wiggin was an American author who wrote Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm. Included in her other accomplishments was that of beginning the first free kindergarten in San Francisco in 1878. I like to begin with this lady pioneer in education as I feel women trailblazers have really had to work to get us to where we are in this day and age. Her life and the triumphs she made despite adversity give us something to emulate.

While deciding on this post topic, I found a little tidbit in my grandmother’s clippings. This grouping includes a quote from this great lady and I’ll share it in a bit. But first, I wanted to give my daughter’s best friend a huge congratulations on this day, the day after her graduation. Today she is officially Dr. and there was much sacrifice for her to get to this place. And along the way, she gave safe harbor to my daughter. Seemingly alone, when miles away from family and friends, she stepped up to stand beside my daughter during what seemed like there was such a formidable mountain to climb. This is the trait of a great, kind and beautiful person. Alex, we certainly wish you many, many blessings in your life and career!

Clippings kept from Grandma Inez meant for Alex I am quite sure!
Clippings kept from Grandma Inez meant for Alex I am quite sure!

To all the graduates out there, not much has changed since the 1920’s era of this publication in what is important in your success. I say, be like Dr. Alex. Start with kindess.

The hooding of Dr. Alex at the University of Kansas, May 18, 2019
The hooding of Dr. Alex at the University of Kansas, May 18, 2019

Inez’s Clippings is a page on my blog with periodical entries based on a small yellow box of collected newspaper clippings belonging to my grandmother Inez Hunter. Click the ‘Inez’s Clippings’ tab above to read more entries as they are published. Thanks so much for visiting!

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Letter X Waves of the Sea/AtoZ 2019

The April A to Z Challenge is in its tenth year, I’ve now participated for 6 of those years, and this year will be my 3rd quilt theme. It’s my first quilt using only patterns from the Kansas City Star newspaper archives. Welcome to my blog!

By the time you get to here you will have noticed (I hope) that there are no letter X’s in the block’s title. But I went with the visual direction the quilt block is arranged in. Do you see it??

I want to point out in the first photo above that I got a little over ambitious on those small half square triangle blocks. I only needed half of them. So another block in the future? Or maybe just another Waves of the Sea block.

10 1/2 inches
10 1/2 inches

Another non-conformist block. It will be fine. I hope.

Waves of the Sea complete
Waves of the Sea complete

Did You Know?

In 1937,native Missourian, Walter Cronkite took a job at United Press (UP) telegraph to cover an explosion in a school in New London, Texas. It was to be his first national headline breaking story. This gas leak explosion caused 295 + deaths as it occured as school was nearly about to let out.

Come back here Monday for another quilt block for the A to Z Challenge! Also be sure to visit the home of the A to Z here and see other entrants challenge posts. There are excellent writers participating every year with topics in whatever you’re interested in.

Weather ‘V’ane/ AtoZ 2019

The April A to Z Challenge is in its tenth year, I’ve now participated for 6 of those years, and this year will be my 3rd quilt theme. It’s my first quilt using only patterns from the Kansas City Star newspaper archives. Welcome to my blog!

I love how it states “Makes a Striking Quilt”. Weather can be pretty striking in certain instances. Kansas City is smack dab in the middle of ‘Tornado Alley’. Well known for that. Some other weather extremes were, most recently, 17 inches of snow dumped mid-January followed by another few inches a week later with pounding winds to boot.

Weather Vane completed
Weather Vane completed

I won’t go on a tangent about our Missouri weather any further. Everyone has extremes in the weather to some extent. So the weather vane in January 1929 might have been an unintentional foreshadowing of the stock market crash and the beginning of the Great Dust Bowl? I just find the irony in these things interesting. Do you?

DId You Know?

According to Weather Channel, Tornado Alley may be shifting east and it’s a mystery as to why. To read more on this phenomenon click here. One reason suspected is the drying of the Great Plains causing this shift. As for someone personally effected, I do believe there has been a shift.

Come back here Monday for another quilt block for the A to Z Challenge! Also be sure to visit the home of the A to Z here and see other entrants challenge posts. There are excellent writers participating every year with topics in whatever you’re interested in

Unexpected Reveal/AtoZ 2019

The April A to Z Challenge is in its tenth year, I’ve now participated for 6 of those years, and this year will be my 3rd quilt theme. It’s my first quilt using only patterns from the Kansas City Star newspaper archives. Welcome to my blog!

Embroidered blocks by my mother
Embroidered blocks by my mother

This project is separate from the Star blocks I’m creating but still fits into the Letter U because the recipients will be Unsuspecting. And I love surprises don’t you?!

Lap Quilt Top with 3 of mom's blocks
Lap Quilt Top with 3 of mom’s blocks

She gave me an uneven number of blocks so it was up to me as to how to create with them. She gave me free reign. I’ll be using up mother’s blocks in this style in lap quilts. And maybe they’ll be ready by next Christmas??

Sunflower Block by Mom
Sunflower Block by Mom

Did You Know?

Sunflowers originated in the Americas in 1000 BC. In 1996 it was chosen as a symbol for peace and a world free of nuclear weapons. I think that makes it pretty special!

Come back here Monday for another quilt block for the A to Z Challenge! Also be sure to visit the home of the A to Z here and see other entrants challenge posts. There are excellent writers participating every year with topics in whatever you’re interested in

Double T /AtoZ 2019

The April A to Z Challenge is in its tenth year, I’ve now participated for 6 of those years, and this year will be my 3rd quilt theme. It’s my first quilt using only patterns from the Kansas City Star newspaper archives. Welcome to my blog!

This block was featured in the Kansas City Star in 1947 but its roots go back much further to the late 1800’s. Women of that day sewed/ quilted for a cause; in particular to promote prohibition of alcoholic beverages. Temperance quilts were the rage.

Did You Know?

The Women’s Christian Temperance Union founded in 1874 created more quilts for this cause than any other. Closing down saloons was the goal and they would pay 10 Cents to get their name on one of these quilts.

My Fabric Choice
My Fabric Choice

Quilts can still be for a cause. Over at Quilting Patch you can create a 12 x 12 inch mini quilt to benefit the tragic loss of Notre Dame. Click here for all the details.

Double T Completed
Double T Completed

Easy peasy, lemon squeezy is how I’ll describe making this block. I’d love to see a whole red and white quilt on my own bed from this one simple block. And to answer a question from a fellow blogger— Yes I would make the same blocks over and over for a quilt. The end result is worth all the effort.

Come back here Monday for another quilt block for the A to Z Challenge! Also be sure to visit the home of the A to Z here and see other entrants challenge posts. There are excellent writers participating every year with topics in whatever you’re interested in

Green Ridge Hotel/ThursdayDoors

Welcome to small town, USA. In this case you have a view down Main Street, Green Ridge, Missouri. To your left is the Business District….about 6 or 7 buildings. Across from it there once were buildings that, unfortunately, were destroyed by fire in days long before I was born.

Think of the cattle drives that went down this street to the stock yards. The cattle were ‘stashed’ in the foreground, fenced until the cattle cars arrived to haul them back East. I used to listen enthralled as my third grade teacher told us these stories. It’s thanks to her that I’m repeating them this Thursday Doors.

For the purposes of the subject matter, I’m going to display some pictures of the Green Ridge Hotel.

Recently, a someone decided to take it upon themselves to save this building. I wonder if they know about the legend that Frank James stayed here once? It’s rumored he was waiting for his brother Jesse to send word to him on ‘plans’. I don’t know how much truth to this there is, but the railroad ended just next to this hotel in 1870, the year Green Ridge was platted (mapped) as a town. 

Back view of the once hotel, now apartment.

I would love to know if someone has a record of this hotel’s guests!

Several additions have been made to this structure over the years.

Before it was rescued to its current state of an apartment, it held a local bar that I have to admit entering as a highschooler. A girlfriend wanted to purchase a pack of cigarettes while we were on lunch break. (wink) My how times have changed. You can’t leave a school during school hours anymore. And those cigarettes are no longer obtainable under age 18 (I kicked the habit in 1990 btw), much less entering a bar under age 21. Wait! and now pot is medicinally approved! Whodathunk?

And that’s what memories are made of when walking past doors of your youth. Hope you’ve enjoyed this weeks entry to Norm 2.0’s Thursday Door. Please visit his blog by clicking here and finding the other entrants. He’ll direct your way.

Corner View/Thursday Doors

Sometimes it’s the position that a door is placed that draws your attention.

Glasgow 2

In my opinion, whoever designed this building was wanting to have a good view of 3 corners of that street. And they got it.

Glasgow 4

Formerly a “Bank” building as the sign indicates. If I’m correct in my footwork, currently a city offices location. Located in downtown Glasgow, Missouri. Listed on the National Register of Historical Buildings.

To see more great Thursday Door posts, visit Norm 2.0 and look for the blue frog at the bottom of his page.

Property-No Acreage/Thursday Doors

Thursday Doors in the words of Norm 2.0, ” is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing it, between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American eastern time), by using the blue link-up button….”

The jaunt through Arrow Rock, Missouri continues for yet one more week. No promises to be finished with it, although I reserve the right to take a break from it. Time will tell.

For sale.jpg

In case you were in the market for some business real estate in the area, here’s one right on the boardwalk of Down Town Arrow Rock. Antique/novelty shop, bakery, hair salon or photo/art studio would be my own personal suggestion. Hint, hint. 😉

Across the street is this pretty significant place in history in the state of Missouri…..

Huston Mercantile 4 (2).jpg

I think the best approach to convincing you of the appeal of this Mid-Missouri real estate is with a little slide show. So hope you enjoy this slice of Huston Mercantile.

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Rural Chariton County/Thursday Doors

Thursday Doors

This week for my Thursday Doors post, I have a piece of yesteryear in CharitonCounty Missouri to share.

Tucked at the junction of Highways 5 and WW, there stands this abandoned building that I believe was once a school house. But I can’t quite be sure. There is not a signpost or placard visible and I didn’t want to trespass. Not that I’m afraid of being confronted….

more that I’m not a huge fan of ticks.

Salisbury4 (2)

The schoolhouse theory could be wrong as I’m not sure there’d be attic windows like these used during this era. So for me, it’s a mystery.

Salisbury5

I’d like to state that I think this would make a pretty fine farmhouse too just for the record. And yes, that is a tv antenna on the roof.

OriginalHowardCounty1816A (2)

I love old maps!

Historically, Chariton County was originally part of Howard County (outlined in bold above). In 1816, its current name and boundaries were given.Icouldn’t find any information on the building above, but I found a little excerpt from a Dept. of Natural Resources document describing the desirability of the area during this time frame.

In one 1819 account from Old Chariton David Manchester wrote to his sister in New York about the new land and how several young bachelors had fared during the 1818-19 winter. Manchester related the federal government land price of $1.50 per acre, but he said that most nearby land sold from $2-6, and the majority aroundChariton was $4 and up. complained of Looking into the future young Manchester the damned contracted New England men are our greatest opponents. They are jealous of us and envy us because they think that we will be admitted into the union on equal footing with the other states and become a large and powerful state. Poor insignificant Devils, who care for you? We will have our right in spite of you. But now [they] want to make slaves of us, no the people of Louisiana never will submit. • The boys are employed in building some houses in Chariton for themselves. . Our employment last winter was carrying on the distillery business. (David Manchester letter, 19 April 1819 #2064 Joint Collection, UMC) This one anecdote accurately described the relatively high value of Chariton district land and the desire of immigrants to make a new home in the Far West.

I wonder if Manchester was also on the search for a beau for his sister??  And a future lil’ homestead in Missouri?

For other Thursday Doors entries, I hope you’ll check the Blue Frog link at the bottom of Norm’s blog.

 

The Womans Building/Thursday Doors

womensbuilding2

For the genteel among us, the Womans Building was built following a need to give women and children a better place to rest at the Missouri State Fair. The philosophy of the times dictated that women and children be segregated rather than encouraging family togetherness. The desire to improve conditions for women and children followed the  popularity of the first one built at the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893.

womensbuilding1

Full view of the current building. In the back and on the ground floor of the building is a museum of the history of the Missouri State Fair. And it’s also a little more like a basement and a good place to spend time during severe weather. There always tends to be at least one heavy storm during the fair each year. When you live across the highway from the fairgrounds for as many years as we have, you tend to recount these things pretty accurately.

womensbuilding

Original cost is said to have been $30,000. An investment well spent.

For other Thursday Door entries, click here and find Norm’s blue link button at the bottom of his post.