Bellflower in the Cradle/Inez’s Clippings

Sun. Jan. 5, 1930

We went down to Grace’s. Harry came to Grandma’s Fri. evening. He is going back about Wed. I made out an order for a suit for Dad.

Mon. Jan. 6, 1930

Dad brought me to school this morning. Keith Browns came back to school this morning. George Davis has a New Ford Coupe. He got it the day after Christmas.

Tues. Jan 7, 1930

This evening I counted up the people who were at our Christmas program and found that there were 25 there. It snowed quite a lot this evening.

Wed. Jan. 8, 1930

I talked to mother this evening. She said that Dean hadn’t gone…..

Pg. 9 — Grandma’s Day Journal– My Hunter Family Collection

Just a refresher. In 1930, Grandma Inez was 17, a one-room schoolhouse teacher, lived away from home except when her dad would bring her home (most weekends it appears). Who are Grace and Harry, Keith Browns and George Davis? I checked the family tree and I found that George is my Great, Great Uncle. My mother says Grace and Harry are “a sister of Mother’s grandfather Al Reed and her husband, namely Grace and Harry Martin.” “Keith Browns” must refer to his children who attended the school. If there’s a family connection to Keith Browns, I’ll note it in a later post.

The difficulty of the times is not mentioned so far. I mean George Davis got a “New Ford Coupe.” What a big deal in the wake of the Crash on Wallstreet! I have to hope he didn’t put up the farm for that new car. Must have been the talk of the town back then. Without today’s technology, those telephone lines must have been burning up! In most instances, I think gossip is neutral, just being the sharing of information. (Let’s not include FaceBook or other social media for the purpose of this post.) I think that’s definitely the case with Grandma. She was never negative in sharing news of folks. Her large collection of clippings shows her vast appreciation for humor. A wonderful example for us to follow!

Continuing on with something good now. For your’s truly, another birthday has passed and I hope it doesn’t make anyone envious of the newest addition to my banjo collection. It’s not just “Another banjo” as my daughters have exclaimed a few times—ok more than a few times. My dear husband purchased a banjo wall wall mount for my latest acquisition, my Stelling. I have wanted a 5-string Stelling for as long as I have known of their existence. And last year, he found one for me. It’s a 1978 5-string Bellflower with rare blonde maple finish. The first Bellflower was built specifically for Hub Nitchie in 1975 who was founder of Banjo Newsletter, my preferred source of banjo playing inspiration. This one was previously owned, loved and played by Beth Mead, banjo player extraordinaire, and reconditioned by Geoff Stelling of Stelling Banjo Works. It has it’s own beautiful sound–likely from its unique Tony Pass Wood Rim–and I am so stoked to have it in my collection! And yes, sharing a photo today for your viewing enjoyment. By the way, Geoff Stelling has just been inducted into the Amercan Banjo Museum! Sometime I’ll share a tune with it as well. Did I mention Grandma played Hawaiian guitar, accordian and the organ? Well, now I have.

And I almost forgot about the hand signature wishing me a happy birthday on the instructions! Should I frame it??? 😉

Hand signature & a Sticker
Hand signature & a Sticker

Thanks for dropping by this week! Til next time stay safe. In the words of Pete Seeger, “This banjo surrounds hate and forces it to surrender.”

4 comments

  1. This is a great post. Enjoy the banjo (I love those instructions, make sure you make that connection over the fingerboard). I like the notes and clippings. They are a great way to look into the past.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I appreciate the supportive comment! I have a few new songs I’m trying to perfect if that’s a good word? lol Just songs you wouldn’t expect to be plucked on the 5-string. Stay tuned…..

      Liked by 1 person

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