Campanile/Thursday Doors

Definition of Campanile: A free standing bell tower especially associated with a church or other public building, especially in Italy.

EX: The Leaning Tower of Pisa is a campanile.

For people in my locality, the definition may be needed. I speak for myself for sure. I know I’ve asked my daughter half a dozen times for the name “of that tower” before it finally sank in. Guess I’m not a person who associates pictures with memorizing. But maybe it will help you in this Thursday Doors post.

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To serve the purpose of the topic of ‘doors’ I present the doorway of the University of Kansas Camponile in which KU graduates pass through during their commencement ceremony. I’m pretty ecstatic that my eldest will pass through here twice in the next year or 2. In May she’ll get her Masters Degree. Woot! Woot! And tentatively, the next May will be for her Ph.D. Such a proud mama in case it wasn’t pretty evident.

 

The bells are housed in the top of the tower as the photo on the far right says.

As it is naptime, I’m not checking to see if this video works, so please excuse my methods if it’s a fail. Notice the eagle didn’t decide to endure them. chuckle

 

Main point to make is that it’s a very meaningful monument for the university. The engravings along the doorway each have symbolic meaning as well. Wish I’d have spent more time studying up, but maybe another time. Naptime is nearly over.

Leaving you with some outward views from this beautiful spot on the campus.

 

Please visit our host for Thursday Doors, Norm 2.0 for more wonderful entries! 

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8 thoughts on “Campanile/Thursday Doors

  1. In Holland I don’t think they have campaniles – the bell tower is always attached to the church building. Can tell you ‘re a very proud momma. Depending on your daughter’s study direction, it may be unusual to do your PHD one year after the Masters, but then she’s young, sand smart:)

    Liked by 1 person

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