Missouri Pacific Depot

I’m sure saving old buildings is a thing.

 I’m just not seeing much of it in my small town. There are plenty of grants out there but I suppose the investment of time is becoming too much for folks these days. So before another one bites the dust, I’m using it for this week’s Thursday Doors entry.

MoPac depotedited

As the pictures says, this is an old depot that was once not so forgotten, the Missouri Pacific Depot. I’m sure these doors have stories to tell. I’ll leave you to wonder what they may be as I give you a few more pictures below.

A pretty hazy day with our unrelenting heat wave. I decided against filters this week. You’re getting the real deal.

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The roof is in good condition, at least on this portion.

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Back view with some stairs lying haphhazard.

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Many of the rails are gone but we still have these left.

For other wonderful Thursday Doors posts, please visit the blog of Norm 2.0 and follow his directions.

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Longwood/Thursday Doors

“CHAPTER XIV.—LONGWOOD TOWNSHIP. Introduction—Name—The English Estate of Longwood—Organization—The First Voting Place—Pin Hook Mills—The First Court in the County—Physical Features—Churches —Schools—Potter Lodge, A. F. & A. M.—Longwood Lodge, I. O. O. F.—Incidents— Murder of Mr. Majors—Col. Fields Killed—Murder of Mrs. Raines—Murderer Burned by a Mob—Village of Longwood—Biographical.”  Excerpt from the History of Pettis County dated 1882. Shared digitally online via archive.org.

Longwood is an unincorporated community in north eastern Pettis County, Missouri. It had its share of goings-on according to the highlights of the chapter indicated above. The building is likely an unused community building and the dates are very faded but I can definitely read 188? to 19??. I know. A big help right?! I chose to photograph this building for the sake of preservation. Too many things being let go in this part of the country and as always, I’d love to hear the stories these doors could tell.

Longwood Community

This section of the county makes for a very pretty Sunday drive when you don’t want to go too far but need to escape summer tourist traffic. So I leave you with a little more from that chapter on Longwood.

“Name.—Longwood derives its name from the town situated on its eastern edge. Of this place it may be said it derives its name from truly aristocratic lineage. In England one of those grand old estates which we delighted to read about in our childhood days, is and has been called for centuries, Longwood, and in this far western county is repeated after the lapse of years, a name that is loved and honored in “that far-oft-house across the sea.” The town was first called Hermantown and the postoffice Oak Grove.”

I hope you’ll decide to head over to the Thursday Doors home at Norm 2.0  and visit the other entrants of doors from around the world.

Mt. Carmel Baptist Church/#Thursday Doors

This past Sunday’s Drive took us through our neighboring county, Morgan County, Missouri. The idea of catching some great doors often hinges (no pun intended) on whether you might get threatened with a double barrel when pointing your camera at someone’s property. I’m still trying to educate my fellow rural Missourians on the world of blogging and our love of scenery. Doors included.

Enter Mt. Carmel Baptist Church, Hwy D, Fortuna, Missouri. Pronounced For-Choo-Na.

You can see there are a good amount of native trees surrounding the church. Literally surrounding it—as well as Virginia Creeper climbing its siding. Some are allergic to this vegetation, so leave it be.

 Not a lot to say about this church as its website is non-operational when I click on it. But the church is listed as a member of the Lamine Baptist Association. So it is under care of a sort. The size of the cemetary suggests it certainly had a vigorous past that dated back to the mid 1800’s.

He took a picture of the interior and I could have shared it, but I made an executive decision to leave it out of this post. Would your conscious bother you?

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When I looked up, I had already made a mental decision.

I hope you’ll decide to head over to the Thursday Doors home at Norm 2.0  and visit the other entrants of doors from around the world.

 

Hearing Cars Rust/#Thursday Doors

First, the doors. This is a sliding door –  garage-style-  with an entrance door to the side.

Setting: Green Ridge, Missouri on one pretty hot, Saturday, June afternoon.

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Green Ridge: population 476 as of Census 2010.

Hearing the cars rust on Main Street is a real thing.

So are Pot Luck and Fundraising dinners, church on Sundays, checking on your neighbors, volunteering, and bad cell phone service (with my phone company choice).

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Click here to visit Norm 2.0 and more doors from around the world.

Ernst & Sons Hardware/#Thursday Doors

Presenting Ernst & Sons Hardware, Lawrence, Kansas. From their  Facebook page I have learned sadly of their end. I never walked through the front doors, but was taken with the entrance at the back parking lot. Love the stonework, the window-paned doors and just the unique personality of this loading dock area.

 

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Home owned hardware stores are becoming extinct and outdone with the huge chain-owned ones that have no idea of what they are snuffing out.

Ernst_son3Take time to visit your small home-town businesses this summer.

For other wonderful Thursday Doors please start out at Norm 2.0 and he’ll direct you to the proper isle.

A Pause/ #ThursdayDoors

I’m pretty sure that part of the reason I enjoy the Thursday Door challenge is to make a feeble attempt at capturing surroundings we normally ignore.

At the last couple of doctor visits, I’ve been thinking about sharing this one…….with a little extra something.

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This is a nice view to see in person, but the camera just isn’t doing it justice.

These are better, but still not there.

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I may not be the expert at panoramic photos, but I think this definitely gives you a better perspective of the edge of the prarie view I wanted you to see. And if you’re needing a way to lower the blood pressure (I hate going to the doctor btw), maybe a minute of taking in a scenic view will help.

Visit the world reknown Norm 2.0 for many more door destinations by clicking here.

Executive Decision

Back in the AtoZ Challenge 2017, I completed the 26 blocks you see below, and then some. The directions often allowed you to cut enough fabric to create 2 blocks. So I thought, why not?! I’ll have extra in case of mistakes. Well, I surprised even myself and had very little waste. So much so that there isn’t much of any of these fabrics left. There’s a familiar ring to this for me. I seem to have a knack for having just enough to do the blocks. Can you say ‘throw caution to the wind’? I must be good at that.

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I also took a vote as you see in that above photo. I wanted to know which color everyone preferred as the sashing (the strips connected the blocks). I totally agreed that the blue was pretty and between the comments and FaceBook, it won the vote.

The unfortunate thing is, I am making an executive decision and using a coordinating gold fabric that there is an ample amount of and as you may notice, there are 30 blocks rather than 26. I am positive that I don’t have enough blue. There is a common theme between the 2017 and 2018 A to Z quilt construction. That common denominator is a lack of fabric as I mentioned above. I’m determined to stay out of the fabric store as long as possible in order to use up my gargantuan fabric supply. So my apologies to my votees

—-the color will be gold. 

North Lamine/#Thursday Doors

I’m offering up a continued edition of last week’s Thursday Doors post. This one is on the opposite side of the tracks in Sedalia, Missouri.

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 Directly to the left of where I stood for that Big Sky View to be more precise. This building at 118 North Lamine I learned through a phone call, yes I still have a land line, has been a moving/storage business for around 80 years. Currently State Fair Moving and Storage operate from here. Prior to that, the informer says he believed it was a carriage building business. It is not on the list I found for the National Historical Register in Sedalia. But in my opinion, it should be. I’m still waiting for a phone call or email of the person who is supposed to know all the good stuff. Til then I hope you enjoy a little slideshow of this golden oldie.

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Please take a moment to visit Norm 2.0 for other great entries in his weekly Thursday Doors challenge!

Crochet Notes

It’s been awhile since I posted a crochet post. However, I’ve not been neglecting my creative duties. I finished the 2018 A to Z Challenge with a quilt top,  began the Season of Yardwork and Gardening, did plenty of mending, got contacted to do some custom items, and finished the following little number for my Etsy shop. There’s never a dull moment at my house.

Just going to make one more of these in Pink and white before I dive into some other projects.

 What’s next? With the heat of summer, I will most likely stick with small projects that won’t raise my temperature in Missouri’s humid months. Here are some Pinterest ideas I find enticing.

I highly encourage these motif centered ideas for my crochet friends along with a tall glass of lemonade while sitting on  your porch. Don’t forget the fan!

 

 

 

Big Sky View/#Thursday Doors

This is my take on one city block of Sedalia, Missouri, Queen City of the Prarie.

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One of these days, I’m hoping for a pic without any vehicles along this street to visualize a hundred years ago.

Visit the world reknown Norm 2.0 for many more door destinations by clicking here.