1907 Classical Revival/ThursdayDoors

Reaching into a stash this week for my Thursday Doors entry. I’m pulling out a 1907, Classical Revival at 112 West 4th Street in Sedalia, Missouri.

A few lights on in the center windows.–Porter-Montgomery Building

Currently this well-kept charmer is housing meetings for the American Red Cross, a local law office and an appraisal service. If there are more offices, I appologize that I don’t have that information.

Plaque on display

Besides being old enough to be on the National Register, it would have seen the
1st US federal corrupt election practices law passed on January 26, 1907. I’m not rattling any political flags, just sharing one fact of the year it was built. You know, being it houses a law firm 🙂

I’m confident that these aren’t the original doors but they are attractive with the entrance.

I intend to go inside and look at those frames on the wall sometime.

Please take time to visit Norm 2.0 for more Thursday Doors from around the world. Click the link and he’ll direct you.

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Italian Villa-Style/ Thursday Doors

Returning this week to Thursday Doors with a share from Lawrence, Kansas. This is the historical home of Samuel A. Riggs. Built in Italian Villa style popular in the East during the time. It shares company with a very small number that survived the raid of Quantrill and his raiders in 1863. It was under construction at the time and had not been occupied. The brick walls stood the test of the fire and the owner repaired it and was able to move into it a year later in 1864. It was their residence for the next 50 years. Moving to Michigan in later years, they still retained ownership until 1931.  In its history it was also a hospital during WWI and has only been sold once, still owned by the widow of KU Professor, Austin Turney. For more interesting reading on the history of this beautiful home, check out kshs.org. So much to tell. If only these doors could talk!

Housewithtower3 (2)

The next time we drive by here, I’ll hopefully get a good picture of the view down the road this home is on. There is a perfect view of Frazier Hall on the KU campus and it really appears very striking in the distance. Traffic just was not letting this happen on this particular day unfortunately.

“Remove not the ancient landmark, which thy forefathers have set.”

— Proverbs 22:28