Longwood/Thursday Doors

“CHAPTER XIV.—LONGWOOD TOWNSHIP. Introduction—Name—The English Estate of Longwood—Organization—The First Voting Place—Pin Hook Mills—The First Court in the County—Physical Features—Churches —Schools—Potter Lodge, A. F. & A. M.—Longwood Lodge, I. O. O. F.—Incidents— Murder of Mr. Majors—Col. Fields Killed—Murder of Mrs. Raines—Murderer Burned by a Mob—Village of Longwood—Biographical.”  Excerpt from the History of Pettis County dated 1882. Shared digitally online via archive.org.

Longwood is an unincorporated community in north eastern Pettis County, Missouri. It had its share of goings-on according to the highlights of the chapter indicated above. The building is likely an unused community building and the dates are very faded but I can definitely read 188? to 19??. I know. A big help right?! I chose to photograph this building for the sake of preservation. Too many things being let go in this part of the country and as always, I’d love to hear the stories these doors could tell.

Longwood Community

This section of the county makes for a very pretty Sunday drive when you don’t want to go too far but need to escape summer tourist traffic. So I leave you with a little more from that chapter on Longwood.

“Name.—Longwood derives its name from the town situated on its eastern edge. Of this place it may be said it derives its name from truly aristocratic lineage. In England one of those grand old estates which we delighted to read about in our childhood days, is and has been called for centuries, Longwood, and in this far western county is repeated after the lapse of years, a name that is loved and honored in “that far-oft-house across the sea.” The town was first called Hermantown and the postoffice Oak Grove.”

I hope you’ll decide to head over to the Thursday Doors home at Norm 2.0  and visit the other entrants of doors from around the world.

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North Lamine/#Thursday Doors

I’m offering up a continued edition of last week’s Thursday Doors post. This one is on the opposite side of the tracks in Sedalia, Missouri.

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 Directly to the left of where I stood for that Big Sky View to be more precise. This building at 118 North Lamine I learned through a phone call, yes I still have a land line, has been a moving/storage business for around 80 years. Currently State Fair Moving and Storage operate from here. Prior to that, the informer says he believed it was a carriage building business. It is not on the list I found for the National Historical Register in Sedalia. But in my opinion, it should be. I’m still waiting for a phone call or email of the person who is supposed to know all the good stuff. Til then I hope you enjoy a little slideshow of this golden oldie.

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Please take a moment to visit Norm 2.0 for other great entries in his weekly Thursday Doors challenge!

Indian Squares/#AtoZ

The April A to Z Blog Challenge is an annual blogging event in which participants blog every day (except Sundays) one post for each letter of the alphabet for the entire month. My theme for the year will be “Quilts and Ozark Slang.” So gitchur coffee or sodapop, grab a pilluh, and sit a spell.

The Letter today is I.

When I embarked on this challenge, the plan was to stick to 2 fabrics per block. Then along came the letter I. All the choices from the book I’m pulling patterns from were doable with just 2 fabrics up until this point. So I had to make a decision.

  1. Whether to choose a letter I block from another book or other source, or
  2. To go with the letter I block from the book that used 3 fabrics.

As you see below, I resolved to add a 3rd fabric. I only needed to add these 4 squares to the entire block. At this point I also noted there were a few other blocks in the alphabet that were going to need an extra color included. So the navy print joins the fold (pun for fun).

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The 3 fabrics. 

This block was looking wonderful except for one problem……..it’s a 15 inch block.  All the other blocks in the book are 12 X 12.

Not sure how I’m going to arrange this quilt as of this writing. Or if I’ll even include it it the finished quilt. Maybe it should be a ‘tag along’ as in this pic my cousin, Michelle, shared with me …..

Quilt w missing square almost.

Whatever happens, I think I may make a note in the book for a future quilter. Warning them of hazards of believing everything you read.

So with that, I’ll give you the finished block

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And a little Ozark slang, “In a coon’s age.” Did you know Daniel Boone was buried in Missouri at one time?  (until some relatives moved his remains to Kentucky.) He wore those coon skin hats they claim. But the saying above implies that racoons live a long time. Wrong. Its a very mistaken idea. So you’d be well advised to use it cautiously.

There are many more wonderful blogs this year that I hope you can spend a couple minutes reading. All you have to do is click here and select something that interests you. To read about the A to Z Challenge and what we are all about, click here.

Columbia, Missouri/ Thursday Doors

A simple phone call can change your plans quickly. Such was the case when we discovered Mother needed a catheterization on her heart before moving forward on a separate procedure. The red flags seemed to be waving at both my sister and myself. Doctors wanted it done as soon as possible……like yesterday. So without further questioning, we took the day off to hopefully be totally wrong.

Mother is pretty much the picture of health and so we were really figuring she’d be scolding us after her procedure. Mom hates for us to miss a day of work, especially for her sake. She forgets how many she missed for us. Time for paybacks.

This blog is for her as well as you Thursday Doorists. Not sure how much she got to see of this hospital? And it is fairly newly renovated in the last couple years. Job well done!

This creation depicts early settlers following the Boone’s Lick Trail down Broadway which is beside this hospital, Boone Hospital. It takes you through the old part of downtown Columbia, Missouri. Just outside of Columbia you’ll cross the Missouri River to take us home.

Which is brings me to the end of Mother’s outcome. It seemed she had two blockages in her right heart artery with a 95% and a 98% blockage. Two stents later, she is home recovering nicely and we are extremely glad!

To see more great Thursday Door posts, visit Norm 2.0 and look for the blue frog at the bottom of his page. And hug your mother today!

Searching for Red/ Thursday Doors

Digging through the archives this week led me to some Red that will, once again, cover the Red prompt for today on Instagram and the Thursday Doors. Some unplanned time off led me down this road and I hope to be back on my photo-taking binges very soon.

To see other Thursday Doors entries, stop by Norm 2.0 and scroll down to the blue frog and click. You’ll see wonderful door posts from around the world.

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The red is pretty washed out here, but it’s hanging in there. No snow currently in Missouri at this time. But I do remember trick-or-treating in snow!

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Slightly more red and all doors seem to be present and accounted for.

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Devoid of doors as far as I can tell. But the red is definitely showing best in my 3rd choice.

A little blast from the past since we’re on the topic of farms from “The History of Pettis County, Missouri 1882”

The first crops were principally corn. Oats, wheat, hemp, flax and rye were raised. The tame grasses were not cultivated. The wild grass was considered good for all stock and hundreds of tons of prairie hay were annually mown by hand and stacked for the winter feed. At an early day spring and fall wheat were both tried. The smut and the accumulation of chintz bugs on spring wheat early convinced the farmers of this section that it was an unprofitable crop. Fall wheat, although not extensively raised, has generally done well. With the early farmers, corn was the staple product, and became the staff of life for man and beast, and the failure of the corn crop brought almost a famine. On corn, the hardy settlers depended for Johnny cake, hominy, hasty pudding, and succotash. Corn was the principal feed for horses, swine, cattle, and sheep. In the early autumn, just as soon as the ears had sufficiently ripened, the farmer with his wife and family entered the corn field, and stripped the blades from the ear down, after which they were cured, bound into bundles, and stacked as provender for winter use. The tops of the stalks were cut above the ear, bound into bundles and shocked for the cattle.

Dr. Matthew Hall / Thursday Doors

Thursday Doors in the words of Norm 2.0 is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing it, between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American eastern time)

Number 15 on the walking tour of Arrow Rock, Missouri is the Dr. Matthew Hall House. Dated 1846, it is nearing 172 years old.

Arrow Rock was established in 1829.

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Dr Matthew 1 (2).jpg  The description in the self-guided tour of Dr. Hall’s influence on this town’s history is stated as saying:

15 Dr. Mathew Hall House,1846|Dr. Hall was a noted civic leader and community physician. In 1856, he moved his family to the country to escape “the evil influence of a river town.”– MDNR       To see more of this guide, click here. 

It must have been a rough place to reside at some point. Hard to imagine now.                              

For me, this town represents much of a ‘frontier-era Missouri’. It sits along the path taken by Lewis and Clark on their famous Expedition.

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I’ve been posting on this town several Thursdays now and I think it’s time to let it go with a slide show of extras. If you happen to be driving down I-70 in central Missouri though, I highly recommend taking the exit to Arrow Rock to see this River Town time capsule. It’s not a tourist trap and comes with a very scenic drive along the way. A real gem!

 

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In-Doors/ Thursday Doors

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These doors are serving as a frame for my weekly entry into the Thursday Doors realm. I could have edited a little more but decided to stick with a realistic lighting.

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This museum is the Missouri History Museum and this is the front view of the statue. Thomas Jefferson was such a remarkable president. They just don’t make ’em like that anymore. Personal note: I was so excited to tour his Monticello home back when my daughters were small that I shut my finger in the car door. It was quite a memory-maker moment to say the least. (I need to see if my old snapshots offer door possibilities).

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Thought you’d like to see what the little green box says.

Thursday Doors finds its beginnings over at Norm 2.0. Please visit and find more door posts there by clicking the blue frog at the bottom of his post. You won’t be disappointed.