Boonville, Mo /ThursdayDoors

Last week I shared some Thursday Doors promoting our flag, Ol’ Glory. This week I’m finishing off the pictures shared with me by my youngest daughter. Always appreciative of the door photos donated (door-nations) as my days can be pretty hectic. Before I continue, I’ll tell you a little bit more about the town of Boonville, Missouri.

Boonville’s population in 2010 was over 8,000 according to the census. The name is from the sons of Daniel Boone, Nathan and Daniel Morgan, who started a salt business near there. Being along the Missouri River aided delivering their goods to St. Louis and they started referring to the trail as Boone’s Lick. A point east of Boonville was considered the beginning point of the Santa Fe Trail. It has around 400 buildings on the National Historic Register and I hope to present some more of them to the Thursday Doors fans in the future. Til then, here are a few that I hope you’ll enjoy.

  • whitewashed-brick
  • 701house
  • 701housecontd
  • Accented by Roses
  • Frosted Glass
  • Lace Curtains
  • Nice Shady Seat
  • Stained Glass

To those who may not be able to see the slideshow, here’s the pictures in a gallery format. I am not sure why it’s viewable to some and not others as I’m not a tech savvy blogger so this is my solution 😉 Have a wonderful rest of your weekend!

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Tightwad/ Thursday Doors

Tightwad, Missouri is a ‘don’t blink or you’ll miss it’ town along scenic highway 7; population 64 according to 2010 census. It’s an hour drive from my home depending on the time of year. ‘Lake traffic’ is all I gotta say about that.

The attraction for me was to present to you the Bank of Tightwad. In its prime it was boasting clients from all over the world. What better way to pay off a debt than with a check from Tightwad Bank? But in actuality there were a lot more novelty accounts than big $$ accounts so it closed its doors in 2006.

The Bank Time
The Bank Time
Tightwad Bank
Tightwad Bank

If you drive past the bank you can imagine how easy it was for the success of numerous robberies that occurred here. It’s a fairly remote location, on a major highway, with acres and acres of lake, access to boating ramps and docks and other side roads that lead to God’s country. Wouldn’t take a genius to figure this out. Not to mention a lack of law enforcement to deter these incidents. I mean, if I can imagine it, I’m pretty sure Anyone can.

Back Door of Tightwad Bank
Back Door of Tightwad Bank
Incinerating instead of shredding documents seems pretty good to me!
Incinerating instead of shredding documents seems pretty good to me!
Fire Department across the street
Fire Department across the street

  The town of Tightwad reportedly received its name from a tale of a postman that, on his route, asked a farmer to save him a watermelon that he’d pick up when he was finished delivering the day’s mail.

When he returned to collect his melon, he learned that the farmer had sold it to someone else for 50 cents more than their agreed price. Enraged, the postal carrier loudly called the farmer a “tightwad” and continued to do so every day after that.

Fire danger is rated "moderate" at the time I snapped this picture across the street from the bank.
Fire danger is rated “moderate” at the time I snapped this picture across the street from the bank.

Thursday Doors comes to you through Norm 2.0 every Thursday. We join his company by adding our own set of doors each week. Please take a couple minutes to visit him and a few of the other participants for some wonderful door views from around the world.

Cla’Y’s Choice/ AtoZ 2019

The April A to Z Challenge is in its tenth year, I’ve now participated for 6 of those years, and this year will be my 3rd quilt theme. It’s my first quilt using only patterns from the Kansas City Star newspaper archives. Welcome to my blog!

Clay’s Choice by the author in blues is lovely. I chose the reds for my own version as the middle pick displays.

Cutting to the chase today for this next to the last quilt block in the AtoZ. It’s been a long last 7 days for me and I won’t bore you with the details right now. But a lil’ tummy bug and a lot of yard work (excavation work) should probably be mentioned. Glad I’ve survived.

Did You Know?

American baseball legend, Yogi (a legit Y entry) Berra, born in St. Louis, Missouri was famous for Yogi-isms. One appropriate for today is: ” When you come to a fork in the road, take it .” And I really chuckle on this one,
“I’m not going to buy my kids an encyclopedia. Let them walk to school like I did.”

Come back here Monday for another quilt block for the A to Z Challenge! Also be sure to visit the home of the A to Z here and see other entrants challenge posts. There are excellent writers participating every year with topics in whatever you’re interested in

Scottish Cross/ AtoZ 2019

The April A to Z Challenge is in its tenth year, I’ve now participated for 6 of those years, and this year will be my 3rd quilt theme. It’s my first quilt using only patterns from the Kansas City Star newspaper archives. Welcome to my blog!

The 1945 Scottish Crown as appeared in the Kansas City Star
The 1945 Scottish Cross as appeared in the Kansas City Star

The Scottish Cross is typically created with plaids and I would suggest it’s a tribute of sorts to things Scottish. Nothing wrong with that! My heritage goes back to that area. But no more on that before I wander into another subject. Let’s focus here on the fabric for this one.

I learned that in researching old Scottish quilts, they preferred to use ‘Turkey’ red plain or prints to prevent bleeding of the colors. Nothing more aggravating than to find all your work ruined by a fabric that can’t keep its’ color to itself. Nowadays, we prewash them. But to avoid this hazard altogether, I chose a different color palette for this block. And besides, I didn’t have much red plaid lying around. And I wasn’t going to use gingham. Nope.

Above you see 3 variations of color arrangments. The one I went with is the first one. I used Plaid-ish prints and stayed in the blue shades. The following pics will give you a view of the steps of this fabric puzzle as it went together.

Finally I present the 1945 Scottish Cross…

Scottish Cross completed
Scottish Cross completed

Did You Know

According to archives at the Truman Library, Missouri’s own President Harry S. Truman’s
ancestry was predominantly English, with a few German, French, and Scottish lines. Most of the families came from Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries, with many of them settling first in Virginia and later moving west to Kentucky. If you ever get the chance, I’d recommend a visit to the Truman Library in Independence, Missouri. You won’t be disappointed!

Come back here Monday for another quilt block for the A to Z Challenge! Also be sure to visit the home of the A to Z here and see other entrants challenge posts. There are excellent writers participating every year with topics in whatever you’re interested in

Letter D for Dutchman’s Puzzle/ AtoZ 2019

The April A to Z Challenge is in its tenth year, I’ve now participated for 6 of those years, and this year will be my 3rd quilt theme. It’s my first quilt using only patterns from the Kansas City Star newspaper archives. Welcome to my blog!

The Dutchman’s Puzzle is basically 8 Flying Geese units arranged in the above style. First published in the 1930 Kansas City Star, I’m pretty sure the method I used from this book was not thought of back then. Thanks to the Star Quilt author for this quick and easy method! Working full-time? This may be a great block for you.

Unfortunately there’s one more sewing step in the above method that I neglected to photograph. In the last step before fully assembling the motifs, you must place one more light block on the top dark corner, draw a line diagonally down the center and sew point to point a 1/4 inch each side of the drawn line, then cut. It gives two more flying geese units- total of 4 with the above method.

Tidying up the block or “squaring it up” is the final step in block making. This gets rid of those ‘dog ears’ (little points on the edge) sticking out and creating unnecessary bulk when you are giving your finished quilt the top stitching of your choice.

Did You Know?

During the 1930’s, the onset of the Great Depression created a revival of sorts in a puzzle craze. Libraries and drug stores offered puzzle rentals for 3 to 10 cents per day.

Come back here tomorrow for another quilt block for the A to Z Challenge! Also be sure to visit the home of the A to Z here and see other entrants challenge posts. There are excellent writers participating every year with topics in whatever you’re interested in.

Letter B for Bear’s Paw/ AtoZ 2019

The April A to Z Challenge is in its tenth year, I’ve now participated for 6 of those years, and this year will be my 3rd quilt theme. It’s my first quilt using only patterns from the Kansas City Star newspaper archives. Welcome to my blog!

Did You Know?

Black bears are a native animal to Missouri, are depicted on the Missouri state flag, and nearly became extinct until lately. Pettis County has been marked on a map
in 2008 and 2010 created by the Missouri Department of Conservation. Locals will tell you there are more recent sightings but apparently it’s not something people report. They’re on the comeback and if you are interested, the Missouri Department of Conservation has a Black Bear Sightings map. click here.

Size Comparison
Size Comparison

First off, a complaint. This is not a 12 inch block as stated in the book. It’s a 14-inch block. And do you know that nearly all of the tutorials online offer 14-inch blocks. I’m sure it’s a quilt dimension thing, like making it a desirable size when completed. But it’s frustrating for me personally when I need all 12-inch blocks. Enough said about that though. On with the block.

Both photos above are cellphone captures of mine from the Star Quilt book. They show a completed quilt on the left using only Bear Paw blocks and a photo as depicted in the Kansas City Star in 1937.

Stacks of lights and darks sorted, Darks counted out, and the Marked Blocks ready to sew are in the 3 pics above. Organization is pretty important in quilting, as is fabric choice, accurate cutting and correct seam allowances. I’m blessed to have years and years of tutoring from my own mother and grandmother in making this daunting task to some come so easily for me. But remember, there’s always Youtube when problems arise. 😉

Finding out the size at the start is something I neglected until the moment I began this layout process. By the time I made it to the last seam (Middle Photo), I knew I had a pretty large block on my hands. So what to do?

Bear Paw completed

By the end of the A to Z Challenge I’ll have a solution for this large block. It may or may not fit into my quilt in this instance. Other options may include a new block with the correct dimensions, or a pillow creation, or possibly a whole quilt with only Bear Paw blocks? Each of these are possibilities that I’ll consider.

Come back here tomorrow for another quilt block for the A to Z Challenge! Also be sure to visit the home of the A to Z here and see other entrants challenge posts. There are excellent writers participating every year with topics in whatever you’re interested in.

Letter A for Album /AtoZ2019

Welcome!

The April A to Z Challenge is in its tenth year and I’ve now participated for 6 of those years. This year will be my 3rd quilt theme and my first quilt using only patterns from the Kansas City Star newspaper archives. I purchased 2 books to help me accomplish this.

Kansas City Star Books for my A to Z Challenge
Kansas City Star Books for my A to Z Challenge

Why the Kansas City Star blocks? Well I’m a native, lifetime-resident Missourian and feeling like sharing a part of our history here this year. The result, I hope, will leave you with some quilt knowledge and appreciation as well as possibly learning a scrap of information for each year of these blocks—being it’s a scrappy quilt.

So for the beginning of the quilt, we’re using the pattern entered in the KC Star in 1928– the Album block. In my opinion, it’s the perfect way to start so that I’ll have a way to memorialize the quilt with either a favorite saying, or quote from a fellow A to Z partipant.

The uses for an album block in the past predate photo albums as they are used for signatures to celebrate births, weddings, and fairwells with friends and family.

Completed Album Block
Completed Album Block
From Star Quilts ©KansasCityStarBooks
This is an antique version of an album quilt

Did You Know?

Sliced bread sold for the first time in Chillicothe (Chill – a – koth – ee), Missouri in 1928 thanks to Otto Frederick Rohwedder’s machine invention.

Come back here tomorrow for another quilt block for the A to Z Challenge! Also be sure to visit the home of the A to Z here and see other entrants challenge posts …..the next best thing to sliced bread! (couldn’t resist) There are excellent writers participating every year with topics in whatever you’re interested in.

Railroad Crossing/#AtoZChallenge

During the month of April, I’m participating in the Blogging From A to Z Challenge for my 4th year in a row – 3 of which are on this blog. Each day, except Sundays, there will be a post for the letter of the day as well as keeping with my personal theme of Quilts and Quotes. Feel free to leave a comment! I’d love to hear from you! Also check out the other A to Z’ers in the comment section of the Official A to Z Blog Page.

Sedalia, Missouri’s rich railroad background is evident in many business names. There’s the Katy Trail Community Health, Katy Trail Children’s Center, Katy Park Baptist Church, Katy Motors, as well as Kehde’s (say Kay-dees) Restaurant which features a train car dining area. There are more but you get the idea. Recently I found someone on Facebook had shared some old pictures of the M.K.T Shops. Many thanks to them!

Mktshops

Mktshops1

Our family connection to the Shops goes back to my husband’s Grandfather, my Uncle and I’m sure there are many more I’m not aware of. I have a rather large extended family.  I would love to have seen the place in its hayday. Now it’s just a fraction of what it was then. Much of it torn down or abandoned.

The Railroad Crossing block has come in different variations, changing with the times and/or interpretation.

RailroadSamplesImage

Mine was from the book, naturally, to keep the size consistent with the previous ones.

RailroadCollageImage

Here’s my finished block.

RailroadCrossingFramed

I could see a whole quilt with this one turn out beautifully.

Some sage advice in today’s quote: RailroadWillRogers

Photo taken at the 3rd & Engineer crossing in Sedalia, Missouri, April 2017

Join me again tomorrow for more of the April A to Z Blog Challenge 2017!

Our Village Green/#AtoZChallenge

During the month of April, I’m participating in the Blogging From A to Z Challenge for my 4th year in a row – 3 of which are on this blog. Each day, except Sundays, there will be a post for the letter of the day as well as keeping with my personal theme of Quilts and Quotes. Feel free to leave a comment! I’d love to hear from you! Also check out the other A to Z’ers in the comment section of the Official A to Z Blog Page.

Being proud of your community is what this quilt block brings to mind for me. I grew up in rural Pettis County, Missouri and the gatherings took place at one of 2 spots. The Manila School or Antioch Baptist Church were those places.

OurVillageGreencollageImage

Manila School now stands abandoned where a bridal shower was held for me 30 years ago this month. Antioch Baptist Church is still alive and well. There, I attended Sunday School and Worship Services.  The grounds of both are lovingly attended to thankfully.

Until this blog post, it never occurred to me to take a photo of these two places from my childhood. I even had to ask my mother if we have any photos of them. Her answer was “probably somewhere”, but I’m not so sure. I think I would have remembered them. I was the camera hound at an early age. I have photo albums of my own and in none of them are these places. I believe I must have been too busy socializing to think ahead 45 years. So I have to appreciate even more the way this challenge has shown me those memories I need to hold dear.

OurVillageGreenBlockCollageImage

For the record, I need much more practice at completing one of these blocks. It was not user-friendly and I am not sure I am up to another attempt. What you see is what you get. As long as it holds together, we’re using it.

“Knowledge is power, Community is strength and Positive attitude is everything.”     Lance Armstrong

Join me again tomorrow for more of the April A to Z Blog Challenge 2017!

New Waterwheel/#AtoZChallenge

During the month of April, I’m participating in the Blogging From A to Z Challenge for my 4th year in a row – 3 of which are on this blog. Each day, except Sundays, there will be a post for the letter of the day as well as keeping with my personal theme of Quilts and Quotes. Feel free to leave a comment! I’d love to hear from you! Also check out the other A to Z’ers in the comment section of the Official A to Z Blog Page.

Waterwheels are often associated with grist mills and dutch windmills. For me, I think of steamboats on the Missouri River. The Mighty Mo is dotted with buried, sunken steamboats.

DCFC0080.JPG

Restored paddle wheel of the Steamboat Arabia

The 1856 Steamboat Arabia was discovered, excavated and is on display at the Steamboat Arabia Museum in Kansas City, Missouri, since 1991. It is one of the finest displays ‘in progress’ in the world. It is well worth a few dollars and your time.

There was only a single life lost on the wreck of the Arabia.

MulecollageImage“The owner of the mule was intereviewed shortly after the sinking of the Arabia. He reported that he tried his very best to free his mule, but it was just too stubborn and would not leave the sinking steamer. The mule, however, would tell a different story for the reins were  discovered as they had been for 132 years — firmly tied to the lumber mill jack.” I wonder how many of the people then were as doubtful as I was when I first read this story. Mules happen to be very good swimmers.

So for this Letter N quilt block, chose this block pattern.

New waterwheelPattern

I couldn’t resist giving it a ‘watered down’ appearance. (chuckle)

New waterwheelframed

This one is slightly larger than 6 inches (6 3/4), but we will make it work with a little fudgin’.

Join me again tomorrow for more of the April A to Z Blog Challenge 2017!