From the Heart/#AtoZ

The April A to Z Blog Challenge is an annual blogging event in which participants blog every day (except Sundays) one post for each letter of the alphabet for the entire month. My theme for the year will be “Quilts and Ozark Slang.” So gitchur coffee or sodapop, grab a pilluh, and sit a spell.

The Letter today is H.

This heart-shaped block took me less that 25 minutes to sew together. I can imagine a whole set of them, cut and prepared would take just an afternoon to work up. A set of these could make a wonderful set of pillow tops or even a little table runner. This may be an idea for a future project to use up some of my fabric leftovers. Time will tell. So much fabric, so little time as the saying goes.

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From the Heart finished block

Speaking of sayings, today’s Ozark slang is “had a falling out“. In case you weren’t aware, the Ozarks are included in “The Bible Belt”. Here is a map from Wikipedia.

BibleBeltmapTo explain it, it is saying they aren’t friends any longer. When friendships are disrupted or worse yet, broken, it seems like folks around here start preaching about forgiveness. Why? Because forgiveness promotes Healing. And the heart can’t take too much stress without reacting. There’s a good many issues related to living with stress as everyone knows.

Colossians 3:13 says: “Bear with each other and forgive one another if any of you has a grievance against someone. Forgive as the Lord forgave you.” 

Bitterness and pain are poison. Let things go. Forgiveness is not saying it’s ok what occurred. But it releases the issue to the Lord and its hold on us.

There are many more wonderful blogs this year that I hope you can spend a couple minutes reading. All you have to do is click here and select something that interests you. To read about the A to Z Challenge and what we are all about, click here.

 

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Flat-iron Patchwork/#AtoZ

The April A to Z Blog Challenge is an annual blogging event in which participants blog every day (except Sundays) one post for each letter of the alphabet for the entire month. My theme for the year will be “Quilts and Ozark Slang.” So gitchur coffee or sodapop, grab a pilluh, and sit a spell.

The Letter today is F.

The style of this quilt block is one many refer to as a basket-style block. It can also refer to bowls or trees with the way it has a ‘pedestal’ shape in one half of the block. I’ve made these ‘sugar bowl’ blocks before and you can see the similarity.

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Sugar Bowl Quilt Block

The finished Flat-iron Patchwork would best be compared to an old-fashioned iron as far as what it represents. Since I’m the only one in this house who ever holds a clothes iron, I am pretty sure a flat iron for the hair would be the association for the rest of my gang.  Or possibly a flat iron steak when they’re wanting something grilled. Whatever your intrepretation, here’s the finished block.

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Today’s Ozark Slang is Figgur. You may think it is a word related to numbers, and it is particially used for that on occasion. Such as “Those figgurs don’t add up.”  But most likely, you’ll hear it used as in this sentence: “Keep tryin’, you’ll figgur it out.”

It can be a form of encouragement to hear this. Or it is someone telling you that

  1. The person addressed isn’t mature enough to listen to your advice. So don’t waste your breath giving them any.    Or
  2. They probably won’t listen to you anyway; so just walk away.

There are many more wonderful blogs this year that I hope you can spend a couple minutes reading. All you have to do is click here and select something that interests you. To read about the A to Z Challenge and what we are all about, click here.

Eight Hands Around/#AtoZ

The April A to Z Blog Challenge is an annual blogging event in which participants blog every day (except Sundays) one post for each letter of the alphabet for the entire month. My theme for the year will be “Quilts and Ozark Slang.” So gitchur coffee or sodapop, grab a pilluh, and sit a spell.

The Letter today is E.

Something I haven’t Explained yet is the reason to lay out the pieces as you see above. One reason, for me at least, is to make sure all the right sides are facing up. Sometimes the difference between the front and back of a fabric is pretty similar…..until you sew it together wrong. Then it sticks out like a sore thumb. And of course you’d be obligated to rip it out and sew it over. Just a pain when you are on a timeline like this A to Z Challenge. Carpenters measure twice, cut once. Quilters check the fabric by it’s right or wrong side as well as if it’s in the correct direction. We’ll leave the ‘direction’ of the fabric topic for another post, though.8HandsAround2

Eight Hands Around is a title that is supposed to be a reference to a quilting bee. And one of the words you may hear a few old-timers say at said quilt gathering is ‘Edumacated’.  It’s just saying, “They went off to college, earned a law degree, or Ph.D, or some other higher education.” In such a setting, it would be used to suggest pride in the one they’re referring to. Because of course, we want to see our friends and relatives do better. It gives us a sense of pride that they came from our region and “made it” in the world. Success gives us mothers something to brag about too. (wink wink)

There are many more wonderful blogs this year that I hope you can spend a couple minutes reading. All you have to do is click here and select something that interests you. To read about the A to Z Challenge and what we are all about, click here.

Pano/ThursdayDoors

Some days call for an undemanding entry in the realm of blogging. This is one. I present a panoramic view of a back lot parking area of downtown Mexico, Missouri. Doors to feast the eyes on in an array of types and conditions.

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Back Doors, Tail Gate Door, Dumpster Doors Blocked Doors.

For other Thursday Doors entries, visit our host Norm 2.0. Thanks so much for your visit!

Wooldridge and Overton Bottoms/ Thursday Doors

Wooldridge, Missouri was a victim of the Flood of ’93. Driving down into the Overton Bottoms Refuge area (which is adjacent to Wooldridge), it’s hard to get a feel for the volume of water that ran this town into near collapse. This Sign signifies an entrance.

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The map helps our minds grasp a picture of the area the refuge embodies.

There were still crops to harvest at the time we meandered down this gravel road.

Driving over the tracks, aka city limits.

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I didn’t find a lot of information about Wooldridge, Missouri other than the flooding of ’93 and the founder’s name. But I found several moments where I wished for someone to be standing outside that I could have asked a few questions. In the meantime, I leave you with the last photo here of some hidden doors that are behind that semi- trailer.

Sidenote: I found it tough to snap photos of the delapidated places we drove past here. I felt I was nearly intruding on these residents and the conditions some were actually living in. But hindsight has brought me the realization that I should have photographed it for various reasons. One huge reason is for a viewpoint of the lasting impact of natural disasters. Lesson learned. 

For other Thursday Doors entries, check out Norm 2.0 and find the blue frog button on the bottom of his latest Doors post.

 

 

A Gem on Route 66 /ThursdayDoors

Thursday Doors

When at the Missouri History Museum we were tempted with the display of an ice cream shop on Route 66 that is still open after 80 years. Introducing Ted Drewes.

But first, probably the only door I could find worth a hoot for this post…….

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A reminder of something that has disappeared within the last 80 years. Related are: Where will Superman do his quick change, How to make collect calls, Answering a random phone booth ringing and Using actual money to make a phone call, all a part of history.

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Back to Ted Drewe’s –a first view. Here’s a little hint. If you see nuns eating at an establishment, it’s gonna be O.K.

Who is Ted Drewe’s? Ted Drewes Sr., was a St. Louis attraction, winning the Muny Tennis Championships each year from 1925 to 1936. Feel free to read more here.

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A ‘door’ for posterity’s sake.

Boasting 12 serving windows, Ted Drewes motto is “Our Business is Service”.

The website tells that it is hardly recognizable during the Christmas season as they sell trees and the lot is loaded with them. They’ve been doing that for over 50 years. One thing you can say about this place is that they are certainly good at longevity and have obviously found their niche in St. Louis.

A line in the summer sun makes the treat even more delish.

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The daughters approve! Our ‘adoptee’ daughter was a great tour guide to go along with the GPS and we thank you Miss Meaghan for your outstanding hospitality! Til next time….

Other Doors posts seen here at Norm 2.0. Enjoy!

The Newlyweds/WPC

Delta

This week, share a photograph that signifies transitions and change to you. It can be the very beginning of a phase, or the very end. As you pick up your lens, explore the ways in which a single photograph can express time, while only showing us a small portion of any given moment.

I’m choosing a recent moment from this past weekend at my neice’s wedding. All eyes are upon you at that transitional moment in time where you become The Mr. and Mrs.

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All our love and blessings to you both!!

For other photo challenge entries, click here.

Uncelebrated/Thursday Doors

The often uncelebrated,underappreciated and unnoticed are in my spotlight this Thursday Doors post.

Sedalia PO2017

US Post Office in Sedalia, Missouri March 2017

One evening recently, while standing in line, a young woman insisted she be given a package (of meds) without the appropriate signature. Those of us standing by were suddenly privy to a very tense moment between the post office personel and this woman. It didn’t end with a positive note as the young woman stormed out with some choice words. But the employees of this particular office were very professional and stood their ground. Pat on the back to you! My question is this:

Why cause such a brouhaha? There wasn’t time to bring a signature back since they closed in 5 minutes?

Now it’s confession time. I’ve been that upset before and it was not  A-Door-able. Hopefully I’ve gained at least some wisdom with age.

At this time I’d like to extend my sincerest apologies to any of my victims.

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Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world.”  For other Thursday Door entries, click here and find Norm’s blue link button at the bottom of his post.

The Solo in Solitude/WPC

Solitude

 As a youngster, I think I always knew when my father needed some solitude. He was a painter by trade in rural Missouri, USA, where he had work 6 out of the 12 months of the year. We lived too far from a major city for him to have regular work. So we did the best we could and lived a good frugal lifestyle where he spent the wintertime raising pigs or a couple calves to take to the butcher come spring. Most people back then called that Poor.

Playing solitaire was his ‘time’.bill-randall-11

And I’m glad I was quiet enough to sit and watch and learn. He was pretty cool like that.

He was also a daily Bible reader in later years. Not a lot of people know that. I am also truly thankful to have had that example to follow.mother

My mother is a living example to me of one who excels in solitude with her talents. She is always keeping her hands busy. Ecclesiastes 9:10 says,  “Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with thy might;”. This defines my wonderful mother. Whether sewing, making jams, jellies, or reading novel after novel, she finishes what she begins whole-heartedly. Rarely does she have a UFO(Un-Finished-Object) lying in her stash. solitudebanjo

For me, solitude is respresented by my time to play music. Alone. Unhindered by life’s stress. Uninterrupted by anything.

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And just for fun to lighten the mood of this post, I’m thinking I should change my answering machine message to a 40 minute Banjo Solo 🙂

Is there 40 minutes on it???

To see other Weekly Photo Challenge entries, click here.