Letter F for Farmer’s Daughter/ AtoZ 2019

The April A to Z Challenge is in its tenth year, I’ve now participated for 6 of those years, and this year will be my 3rd quilt theme. It’s my first quilt using only patterns from the Kansas City Star newspaper archives. Welcome to my blog!

Did You Know?

In 1935, the Great Depression as well as the event known as the Dust Bowl were in full swing and we weren’t aware we’d made the halfway point here in the MidWest. You don’t hear a lot about my native Missouri and the Dust Bowl, but according to some old-timers I’ve known, we felt the repercussions plenty. Just to give you a little idea of the land value for typical Missouri acreage, I’ve looked at the University of Missouri’s stats and here is how the following years compared:

  • 1920 — An acre valued at $88.
  • 1935 — Same acre valued at $33

The Farmer’s Daughter quilt block is one of the blocks featured in the 1935 Kansas City Star and I’m pretty sure farming was the hottest topic in the MidWest at that time with the future of this vocation in severe dire straits. Kudos to all the quilters of that time trying to keep their chins up by staying creative with their needles and thread.

Lots of color variations possible with this one
Lots of color variations possible with this one

This quilt is about as good as it gets for me personally. Cut, sewn, pressed and it even measured the correct 12-ish inches (You have to allow for those seam allowances as well as squaring up the blocks.) Here’s a little gallery of pics on a portion of the block construction.

Not hard, great for using up scraps and versatile. Can’t ask for more.

Farmer's Daughter Complete
Farmer’s Daughter Complete

Come back here tomorrow for another quilt block for the A to Z Challenge! Also be sure to visit the home of the A to Z here and see other entrants challenge posts. There are excellent writers participating every year with topics in whatever you’re interested in.

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Letter B for Bear’s Paw/ AtoZ 2019

The April A to Z Challenge is in its tenth year, I’ve now participated for 6 of those years, and this year will be my 3rd quilt theme. It’s my first quilt using only patterns from the Kansas City Star newspaper archives. Welcome to my blog!

Did You Know?

Black bears are a native animal to Missouri, are depicted on the Missouri state flag, and nearly became extinct until lately. Pettis County has been marked on a map
in 2008 and 2010 created by the Missouri Department of Conservation. Locals will tell you there are more recent sightings but apparently it’s not something people report. They’re on the comeback and if you are interested, the Missouri Department of Conservation has a Black Bear Sightings map. click here.

Size Comparison
Size Comparison

First off, a complaint. This is not a 12 inch block as stated in the book. It’s a 14-inch block. And do you know that nearly all of the tutorials online offer 14-inch blocks. I’m sure it’s a quilt dimension thing, like making it a desirable size when completed. But it’s frustrating for me personally when I need all 12-inch blocks. Enough said about that though. On with the block.

Both photos above are cellphone captures of mine from the Star Quilt book. They show a completed quilt on the left using only Bear Paw blocks and a photo as depicted in the Kansas City Star in 1937.

Stacks of lights and darks sorted, Darks counted out, and the Marked Blocks ready to sew are in the 3 pics above. Organization is pretty important in quilting, as is fabric choice, accurate cutting and correct seam allowances. I’m blessed to have years and years of tutoring from my own mother and grandmother in making this daunting task to some come so easily for me. But remember, there’s always Youtube when problems arise. 😉

Finding out the size at the start is something I neglected until the moment I began this layout process. By the time I made it to the last seam (Middle Photo), I knew I had a pretty large block on my hands. So what to do?

Bear Paw completed

By the end of the A to Z Challenge I’ll have a solution for this large block. It may or may not fit into my quilt in this instance. Other options may include a new block with the correct dimensions, or a pillow creation, or possibly a whole quilt with only Bear Paw blocks? Each of these are possibilities that I’ll consider.

Come back here tomorrow for another quilt block for the A to Z Challenge! Also be sure to visit the home of the A to Z here and see other entrants challenge posts. There are excellent writers participating every year with topics in whatever you’re interested in.

Letter A for Album /AtoZ2019

Welcome!

The April A to Z Challenge is in its tenth year and I’ve now participated for 6 of those years. This year will be my 3rd quilt theme and my first quilt using only patterns from the Kansas City Star newspaper archives. I purchased 2 books to help me accomplish this.

Kansas City Star Books for my A to Z Challenge
Kansas City Star Books for my A to Z Challenge

Why the Kansas City Star blocks? Well I’m a native, lifetime-resident Missourian and feeling like sharing a part of our history here this year. The result, I hope, will leave you with some quilt knowledge and appreciation as well as possibly learning a scrap of information for each year of these blocks—being it’s a scrappy quilt.

So for the beginning of the quilt, we’re using the pattern entered in the KC Star in 1928– the Album block. In my opinion, it’s the perfect way to start so that I’ll have a way to memorialize the quilt with either a favorite saying, or quote from a fellow A to Z partipant.

The uses for an album block in the past predate photo albums as they are used for signatures to celebrate births, weddings, and fairwells with friends and family.

Completed Album Block
Completed Album Block
From Star Quilts ©KansasCityStarBooks
This is an antique version of an album quilt

Did You Know?

Sliced bread sold for the first time in Chillicothe (Chill – a – koth – ee), Missouri in 1928 thanks to Otto Frederick Rohwedder’s machine invention.

Come back here tomorrow for another quilt block for the A to Z Challenge! Also be sure to visit the home of the A to Z here and see other entrants challenge posts …..the next best thing to sliced bread! (couldn’t resist) There are excellent writers participating every year with topics in whatever you’re interested in.