Persimmon Report 2018/ThursdayDoors

Findings have already been shown by a couple of my FaceBook friends, but I had a high school friend message me for my personal findings. We’re talking about the Annual Persimmon Report here. So for this week on my Thursday Doors post, we’re headed Outdoors.

Before we get to the results of my seeds’ hidden prediction, I’d like to take time to discuss where these trees grow and if you may be able to find one in your location.  According to https://garden.org/learn/articles/view/4136/, 

Persimmon trees are hardy in USDA zones 5 to 11. However, you’ll have to select the right type for your area. There are two types of persimmon trees. The Asian persimmon (Diospyros kaki) grows in USDA hardiness zones 7 to 11, and is known for its large fruits on smaller trees. It’s the type often sold in grocery stores.

The American persimmon (D. virginiana) is a faster growing, larger tree that’s hardy to USDA zone 5. It produces smaller fruits, which some consider richer in flavor than its Asian cousins.

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Un-ripe when green, but there was a 4th one that was ready to pick.

The American persimmon has always been my choice when doing my search for the winter predictions. It’s what I am most familiar with and it’s native to our part of the country. As far as being richer in flavor, I have no idea about that. I’ve never cooked with them and don’t plan on it. Very sticky, stringy and a major consumption of time and energy in my opinion. To those who make pudding, jam, bread and etc with these, my hats off to you. Just not for me. But apparently those pesky Japanese Beetles don’t like them. The tree was loaded with fruit.

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This particular fruit only had 3 seeds. Many have 5 to 6. May be a result of our very dry summer.

So drum roll please……………………………….

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This is just one more tedious task to find out that forecast. No cuts I’m happy to say.

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Spoons! All Spoons!

We’re headed for a snowy winter in case you don’t know what these spoons mean. Not what I wanted to find but to my dear fellow FaceBookians, you already knew this. Has anyone checked the Farmers Almanac for their opinion on this? I’d happily take a less dire forecast. Make sure you’re prepared if you live in these snow prone areas.

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Ending today’s post with this glimpse of 2 young deer about to cross the trail less than 200 yards away from my home.

Please take time to check the other Thursday Doors posts at our guest host this week, Mexi Move the Third. Much gratitude to them for keeping these doors from being snowed in.

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Persimmon Report/ Thursday Doors

I have to give kudos to Google for ‘trying’ to make this into a panoramic photo. So we’re going to ignore the fact that this roof line is a little, shall we say misshapen. But it does give me a jump off point for this week’s Thursday Doors post.

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Back Doors

I present the Academy Boarding House, circa 1829, at Arrow Rock, Missouri.

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Arrow Rock, Missouri is a National Historic Landmark. It is a village along the Missouri River that has been restored and is now preserved in its 1829 version for tourists to see a typical river town of the time. My first visit there was on a 7th grade field trip. (Thanks Miss Carter)

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Since public education didn’t exist until after the Civil War, the students of ‘The Academy’ (no longer standing) boarded here for $2.50 a week back in the year 1843. This is a log house underneath that white clapboard siding.

 

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Peering inside one of the front windows, I was able to capture one of the back doors. And outside that door is a persimmon tree that I’ve used to find the ‘winter prediction’ a few times. Inside each seed you’ll find one of three: Knife, Spoon, or Fork.

  • Knife = biting cold
  • Spoon= lots of snow shoveling
  • Fork = mild winter

Do you want to know what the verdict is for this year??

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I’ll let you know after I reminisce about watching my little girls roll down this hill. They probably wouldn’t want to try that now that they’re in their 20’s. You can tell we’ve visited here often. Great place to take a stroll in the Fall!

And the verdict is in……………… The 2017 Persimmon Report shows

 

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1 Spoon and 1 Knife. The 3rd seed was undetermined as it fell apart upon slicing. Be ready for a snowy, sharply cold winter according to Native American legend.

For other wonderful Thursday Door posts, click here to stop by Norm 2.0 and find the blue frog button.