D and T Quilt Shop/Thursday Doors

For the record I have 1 cat. 

I have rarely participated in Black Friday. I happen to think it’s a ploy to rob me. But this year was different. I actually called my mother to invite her along. Stop The Press!!

Yes there was some urgency.

Not my photo. Too rainy that day for me to worry with it.

There was a notice in our paper that the owner of this shop had passed away. And they are selling her fabric at a significantly lower price and closing shop. This local business has been a very big blessing in our area. We live an hour in any direction from the nearest big chain fabric store. (Until recently, we acquired a Hobby Lobby) But let’s get real. This was the Ultra fabric stop for serious quilters.

Mom and I decided to check out the bargains and show our support for the family. This must be difficult for them.

Below is my ‘haul’. I am planning some serious sewing this coming year.  

Mom thought the blue floral reminded her of something her own mother would have used for a dress. Can I get an awwwww?!  Miss my grandmother very much! So blessed to still have my momma!

This is a better look at the fat quarters.

Buy 50/ Get 50 free. And they were already reduced. An irresistable deal. Mother and I both succumbed.

A peek at the gallery will show you all the tiny ‘doors’ I found in this treasure trove. I hope you’ll, somehow, identify with this version of Thursday Doors and take time to visit Norm 2.0 for beautiful door posts around the globe.

I was neglectful in mentioning the transportation provided by my eldest daughter. Thank you Rachel for tolerating and enabling your mother and grandmother on this expedition. Love you bunches!!!

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Green Ridge Hotel/ThursdayDoors

Welcome to small town, USA. In this case you have a view down Main Street, Green Ridge, Missouri. To your left is the Business District….about 6 or 7 buildings. Across from it there once were buildings that, unfortunately, were destroyed by fire in days long before I was born.

Think of the cattle drives that went down this street to the stock yards. The cattle were ‘stashed’ in the foreground, fenced until the cattle cars arrived to haul them back East. I used to listen enthralled as my third grade teacher told us these stories. It’s thanks to her that I’m repeating them this Thursday Doors.

For the purposes of the subject matter, I’m going to display some pictures of the Green Ridge Hotel.

Recently, a someone decided to take it upon themselves to save this building. I wonder if they know about the legend that Frank James stayed here once? It’s rumored he was waiting for his brother Jesse to send word to him on ‘plans’. I don’t know how much truth to this there is, but the railroad ended just next to this hotel in 1870, the year Green Ridge was platted (mapped) as a town. 

Back view of the once hotel, now apartment.

I would love to know if someone has a record of this hotel’s guests!

Several additions have been made to this structure over the years.

Before it was rescued to its current state of an apartment, it held a local bar that I have to admit entering as a highschooler. A girlfriend wanted to purchase a pack of cigarettes while we were on lunch break. (wink) My how times have changed. You can’t leave a school during school hours anymore. And those cigarettes are no longer obtainable under age 18 (I kicked the habit in 1990 btw), much less entering a bar under age 21. Wait! and now pot is medicinally approved! Whodathunk?

And that’s what memories are made of when walking past doors of your youth. Hope you’ve enjoyed this weeks entry to Norm 2.0’s Thursday Door. Please visit his blog by clicking here and finding the other entrants. He’ll direct your way.

Broadway and Ohio/Thursday Doors

One hundred thirty-three years have passed and this one is still standing in Sedalia, Missouri. Progress has downed several buildings around it, creating parking lots in the process, but Calvary Episcopal Church is a survivor. Just a few photos for this Thursday Doors and little hype. I have always admired the beautiful stained glass and the building itself as a whole. A lovely testament that early Sedalians intended to stay.

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Thanks for visiting! Please take a look at Norm 2.0, Thursday Door’s home site and click on the blue frog for more doors from around the world.

 

520 S. Osage /Thursday Doors

Formerly the First Congregational Church of Sedalia, this 1889 church has been lucky to survive.

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Corner of 6th and Osage

Abandoned in the 80’s, it was acquired by a Slavic congregation as early as 2006, but don’t quote me on that year. This one was hard to find information on.

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Facing South Osage Street

I would hope it is on the National Register of Historical Places. But I haven’t been able to find that data as of yet.

At one point, the church had many more stained glass windows. Unfortunately there have been more modern replacements. Not to mention the basement windows are all closed with cement and blocks.

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Currently the First Slavic Pentecostal Church

I did find Missouri State info suggesting Sedalia is void of any Pre-Civil War buildings. So this one must be one of the earliest.

I hope you enjoy this contribution to Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors for the week. Please visit him for more wonderful doors around the world by clicking here.

Veterans Home/ Thursday Doors

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Mother leading the way to the entrance of the Veterans Home in Mexico, Missouri. 

According to information provided on the Missouri Veterans Commission home page, a person must require institutional health care services, among other criteria to become a resident of one of these facilities. My Uncle Neal is one such person. He has severe short term memory loss and requires a significant amount of supervision. He can have a decent conversation with his visitors, but tomorrow, it will most likely be forgotten.

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We’ve all entered the doors of these sort of places that have ‘that smell’ and I commend this home for not being in that category. And for my Uncle’s sake, I’m much appreciative.

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This is a display donated by a previous Missouri governor, Kit Bond. It houses ‘coins’ he collected over the years. I only wish I could have read the card a little better. Basically these are Challenge Coins (the proper name) and are presented to recognize special achievement to military members.

Pictured above: our humble entourage that included my husband (the photographer for these shots) and my mother, aunt and myself. I love the moment captured between my aunt and uncle above. This is her true, genuine, caring, nurturing nature. Love her!

Let us all remember and honor those who have served in the upcoming Season of Giving and be especially thankful for the sacrifices made.

For other Thursday Door entries, please visit Norm 2.0 where you’ll be met with wonderful door posts from around the globe.Just find the blue frog button and click.

Wooldridge and Overton Bottoms/ Thursday Doors

Wooldridge, Missouri was a victim of the Flood of ’93. Driving down into the Overton Bottoms Refuge area (which is adjacent to Wooldridge), it’s hard to get a feel for the volume of water that ran this town into near collapse. This Sign signifies an entrance.

Little muddy 5

The map helps our minds grasp a picture of the area the refuge embodies.

There were still crops to harvest at the time we meandered down this gravel road.

Driving over the tracks, aka city limits.

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I didn’t find a lot of information about Wooldridge, Missouri other than the flooding of ’93 and the founder’s name. But I found several moments where I wished for someone to be standing outside that I could have asked a few questions. In the meantime, I leave you with the last photo here of some hidden doors that are behind that semi- trailer.

Sidenote: I found it tough to snap photos of the delapidated places we drove past here. I felt I was nearly intruding on these residents and the conditions some were actually living in. But hindsight has brought me the realization that I should have photographed it for various reasons. One huge reason is for a viewpoint of the lasting impact of natural disasters. Lesson learned. 

For other Thursday Doors entries, check out Norm 2.0 and find the blue frog button on the bottom of his latest Doors post.

 

 

A Stop at Wooldridge/ Thursday Doors

I’ve hoarded some pics of a lazy drive through a very small, quiet Mid-Missouri village one Saturday in September. Time to share.

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I love this house on the hill. That, my friend, is what you call a breakfast porch. Sipping your coffee, watching the sun come up is what I would do with a view like that. I can imagine it’s been here about as long as the town has existed. Wooldridge, Missouri, named after Dr. Wooldridge, was founded in 1901.

We drove down Highway 179 passing by a chance to see a rather large Steam Engine Show. We weren’t in the spirit to mingle with large crowds so this little piece of turf seemed to fit the bill.

All small towns have abandoned buildings and most have or have at one point had a post office. The post office has been in operation since 1902. However, you must know this isn’t the original without my telling you. I bet if I had stopped in here, I may have heard some good gossip 😉 Those mail persons know quite a bit about small town inhabitants. You’ll just have to trust me on this.

Even though I have the space for more, I’ll be saving the 2nd half of this doorscursion for (possibly) the next time.

 

Thursday Doors is a weekly blog challenge hosted by Norm 2.0 in which door lovers from around the world join in to show their door finds. To see Norm’s and others, scroll down on his page and click on the blue frog button.

Searching for Red/ Thursday Doors

Digging through the archives this week led me to some Red that will, once again, cover the Red prompt for today on Instagram and the Thursday Doors. Some unplanned time off led me down this road and I hope to be back on my photo-taking binges very soon.

To see other Thursday Doors entries, stop by Norm 2.0 and scroll down to the blue frog and click. You’ll see wonderful door posts from around the world.

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The red is pretty washed out here, but it’s hanging in there. No snow currently in Missouri at this time. But I do remember trick-or-treating in snow!

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Slightly more red and all doors seem to be present and accounted for.

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Devoid of doors as far as I can tell. But the red is definitely showing best in my 3rd choice.

A little blast from the past since we’re on the topic of farms from “The History of Pettis County, Missouri 1882”

The first crops were principally corn. Oats, wheat, hemp, flax and rye were raised. The tame grasses were not cultivated. The wild grass was considered good for all stock and hundreds of tons of prairie hay were annually mown by hand and stacked for the winter feed. At an early day spring and fall wheat were both tried. The smut and the accumulation of chintz bugs on spring wheat early convinced the farmers of this section that it was an unprofitable crop. Fall wheat, although not extensively raised, has generally done well. With the early farmers, corn was the staple product, and became the staff of life for man and beast, and the failure of the corn crop brought almost a famine. On corn, the hardy settlers depended for Johnny cake, hominy, hasty pudding, and succotash. Corn was the principal feed for horses, swine, cattle, and sheep. In the early autumn, just as soon as the ears had sufficiently ripened, the farmer with his wife and family entered the corn field, and stripped the blades from the ear down, after which they were cured, bound into bundles, and stacked as provender for winter use. The tops of the stalks were cut above the ear, bound into bundles and shocked for the cattle.

Last Craft Show/Thursday Doors

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The best stuff is pretty much picked over by the time Mother and I enter the doors at our last craft show of the year. There’s not much more to do but endure 6 hours of “Wait N See”. Thanks to the fine citizens of Windsor, Mo and Henry County who turned out to help us make a little profit. Small Business Saturday ended on a positive note for us.

And to keep my time spent in Windsor even more constructive, I took a few door pics since we still had an hour of daylight left. 

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This is a Windsor, Missouri landmark. You have to drive past it to get to downtown if you’re driving in from the East. I believe it’s a well house.

Right on the Katy Trail is a caboose all decked out for Christmas. The side view is painted with Old Glory highlighting the Spirit of ’76. Bit of info about Windsor….They celebrated their 150th annivesary in 2005.

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The White House of the DoorScursion post.

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The least used door in Windsor? Let’s just say the rest of the building is not so ramshackle. They are visibly just going for a vine look on the north side of this building.

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And it’s for Sale!!

For other Thursday Door entries, click here and find Norm’s blue link button at the bottom of his post.

 

Christbaumfest/Thursday Doors

Norm, the host of Thursday Doors, says I have til Saturday morning to post my entry in his weekly challenge. I’m thankful for that generosity this week. Lots to do this time of year.

Our pile of hand made items. We are in the homestretch of the craft show season once we finish this show. Only one more left to go…..

Sharing with you some of the charm of Historic Downtown Cole Camp in the next few pics.

Colecamp was first settled in the 1830’s and is along what is known as the Butterfield Trail. The Butterfield Trail was a stage line that operated between 1858 – 1861.

ColeCampMo.jpeg Bellview Hotel on the National Historic Registry.

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Some delicious sweets inside those doors.

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Some clothing perhaps?

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Entrepreneurs take notice.

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These are gorgeous doors but I hope the person who decides to start their business here gets rid of that air conditioner. Not cool. (Pardon the pun)

For other Thursday Door entries, click here and find Norm’s blue link button at the bottom of his post.