Hinerville School/ThursdayDoors

Mother, her brother and sisters attended a one-room schoolhouse back in their childhood days. My grandmother was a one-room schoolhouse teacher for a good portion of her twenties. And my own experiences in a one room schoolhouse that housed our local 4-Her’s, offered a place to have ice cream socials, drew in folks for community dinners as well as accomodated the location of my first bridal shower gives these places a big chunk of my heart. So I was happy to find this well-kept school on K-99 right before we were ready to head back to Lawrence on I-70. It was a perfect ending to our long drive on the Kansas Quilt Trail. I hope you enjoy my picture version of personal nostalgia this Thursday Doors.

View across from the schoolhouse—the gated community, rural American style.

I somehow seem to find these ‘Paw Paw’ roads

It’s been my experience that there were little kitchenettes in either the front or rear of these schools. I’d say this one was inside that back door. Notice the chimney often used for heating with a potbelly stove.

Side View

Where asphalt and gravel meet.

Another cattle gate
I would’ve rather rode a pony to school personally.

Brownie points if you’ve ever had to scrape your boots off on those metal devices before.

Hand hewn front step

Thanks for your kind attention this week as I shared this old piece of 1800’s history. Please take time and visit our Doors host, Norm 2.0 and he’ll direct you to more doors from all over the world.

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Big Washout/ Inez’s Clippings

Seems my choice for this post was fairly timely seeing as we had a little snowfall. I love yesterday’s latest tweet I read from Lawrence, Ks PD. Here’s a screenshot/pic……

We had more than a little light snow here in Mid-Missouri. The schools closed due to icy roads …or most of them closed. Some may be in denial on the road conditions. I need to install a live video feed of my neighborhood of the drive-by’s for the schools out there. hehe

For now though I’m going to share some of the Wonder of Winter through the eyes of a child. Hope your Tuesday isn’t a washout.

Kansas State Highway 99/ThursdayDoors

Traveling down K-99 towards I-70 (also known as the Road to Oz) we veered off the Kansas Quilt Trail. But we still enjoyed the charm of billowing clouds, rural farm scenes and just the way wide open spaces rest my eyes.

I'd love to see the view from that hayloft!
I’d love to see the view from that hayloft!

Windy is a normal thing for Kansas and maybe you can tell by the clouds how turbulent the air was that day. But not in the tornadic sense of the word, thankfully. It was actually very good weather to be outdoors for a Midwest day in July.

How many bales of hay have passed through these barn doors over the years?!
How many bales of hay have passed through these barn doors over the years?!

Hope you enjoyed this Thursday Doors post. Please take time to visit Norm 2.0 for more doors from all over. He’ll let you know where to find them. Have a wonderful weekend!!

Scatter Sunshine/Inez’s Clippings

I love the clipping above. The author, Major Edward Bowes, was a radio personality from the 30’s and 40’s. Most famous for his amateur talent show that ran on the radio for 18 years. In fact, one famous singer was featured on his show that everyone will know unless you’re from Mars–that being Frank Sinatra. I found a clip of him singing but I think it might take a bit away from grandma’s clipping. This isn’t about Ol’ Blue Eyes. No disrespect intended. Another time I’ll revisit Frank circa 1935.

I like the clipping above for many of its facets. But Scatter Sunshine really strikes a chord with me. I feel like by acting on this two-word phrase, everything else will follow….a heart free from hate, worry-free mind, love-filled life, thinking of others…..you get the idea I’m sure. Nowadays, we hear of those paying it forward. Very similar thought process. And why not?! What do you have to lose with being kind.

Scattered Sunshine
Scattered Sunshine

Being creative this week in the sewing room and I hope these creations will scatter some sunshine somewhere when they are complete.

Not really taking any votes on these 2 versions of the Pine Tree quilt block. But my preference is the one on the left. They’ll be ready shortly.

What the heck, I’m sharing Frank Sinatra here anyway. Enjoy!! Scattering Sunshine on Inez’s Clippings!

D and T Quilt Shop/Thursday Doors

For the record I have 1 cat. 

I have rarely participated in Black Friday. I happen to think it’s a ploy to rob me. But this year was different. I actually called my mother to invite her along. Stop The Press!!

Yes there was some urgency.

Not my photo. Too rainy that day for me to worry with it.

There was a notice in our paper that the owner of this shop had passed away. And they are selling her fabric at a significantly lower price and closing shop. This local business has been a very big blessing in our area. We live an hour in any direction from the nearest big chain fabric store. (Until recently, we acquired a Hobby Lobby) But let’s get real. This was the Ultra fabric stop for serious quilters.

Mom and I decided to check out the bargains and show our support for the family. This must be difficult for them.

Below is my ‘haul’. I am planning some serious sewing this coming year.  

Mom thought the blue floral reminded her of something her own mother would have used for a dress. Can I get an awwwww?!  Miss my grandmother very much! So blessed to still have my momma!

This is a better look at the fat quarters.

Buy 50/ Get 50 free. And they were already reduced. An irresistable deal. Mother and I both succumbed.

A peek at the gallery will show you all the tiny ‘doors’ I found in this treasure trove. I hope you’ll, somehow, identify with this version of Thursday Doors and take time to visit Norm 2.0 for beautiful door posts around the globe.

I was neglectful in mentioning the transportation provided by my eldest daughter. Thank you Rachel for tolerating and enabling your mother and grandmother on this expedition. Love you bunches!!!

Green Ridge Hotel/ThursdayDoors

Welcome to small town, USA. In this case you have a view down Main Street, Green Ridge, Missouri. To your left is the Business District….about 6 or 7 buildings. Across from it there once were buildings that, unfortunately, were destroyed by fire in days long before I was born.

Think of the cattle drives that went down this street to the stock yards. The cattle were ‘stashed’ in the foreground, fenced until the cattle cars arrived to haul them back East. I used to listen enthralled as my third grade teacher told us these stories. It’s thanks to her that I’m repeating them this Thursday Doors.

For the purposes of the subject matter, I’m going to display some pictures of the Green Ridge Hotel.

Recently, a someone decided to take it upon themselves to save this building. I wonder if they know about the legend that Frank James stayed here once? It’s rumored he was waiting for his brother Jesse to send word to him on ‘plans’. I don’t know how much truth to this there is, but the railroad ended just next to this hotel in 1870, the year Green Ridge was platted (mapped) as a town. 

Back view of the once hotel, now apartment.

I would love to know if someone has a record of this hotel’s guests!

Several additions have been made to this structure over the years.

Before it was rescued to its current state of an apartment, it held a local bar that I have to admit entering as a highschooler. A girlfriend wanted to purchase a pack of cigarettes while we were on lunch break. (wink) My how times have changed. You can’t leave a school during school hours anymore. And those cigarettes are no longer obtainable under age 18 (I kicked the habit in 1990 btw), much less entering a bar under age 21. Wait! and now pot is medicinally approved! Whodathunk?

And that’s what memories are made of when walking past doors of your youth. Hope you’ve enjoyed this weeks entry to Norm 2.0’s Thursday Door. Please visit his blog by clicking here and finding the other entrants. He’ll direct your way.

Broadway and Ohio/Thursday Doors

One hundred thirty-three years have passed and this one is still standing in Sedalia, Missouri. Progress has downed several buildings around it, creating parking lots in the process, but Calvary Episcopal Church is a survivor. Just a few photos for this Thursday Doors and little hype. I have always admired the beautiful stained glass and the building itself as a whole. A lovely testament that early Sedalians intended to stay.

CalvaryEpiscopal.jpg

 

Thanks for visiting! Please take a look at Norm 2.0, Thursday Door’s home site and click on the blue frog for more doors from around the world.

 

520 S. Osage /Thursday Doors

Formerly the First Congregational Church of Sedalia, this 1889 church has been lucky to survive.

Community Church of Sedalia.jpeg

Corner of 6th and Osage

Abandoned in the 80’s, it was acquired by a Slavic congregation as early as 2006, but don’t quote me on that year. This one was hard to find information on.

CommunityChurch.jpeg

Facing South Osage Street

I would hope it is on the National Register of Historical Places. But I haven’t been able to find that data as of yet.

At one point, the church had many more stained glass windows. Unfortunately there have been more modern replacements. Not to mention the basement windows are all closed with cement and blocks.

CommunityChurch2

Currently the First Slavic Pentecostal Church

I did find Missouri State info suggesting Sedalia is void of any Pre-Civil War buildings. So this one must be one of the earliest.

I hope you enjoy this contribution to Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors for the week. Please visit him for more wonderful doors around the world by clicking here.

Veterans Home/ Thursday Doors

IMG_7050

Mother leading the way to the entrance of the Veterans Home in Mexico, Missouri. 

According to information provided on the Missouri Veterans Commission home page, a person must require institutional health care services, among other criteria to become a resident of one of these facilities. My Uncle Neal is one such person. He has severe short term memory loss and requires a significant amount of supervision. He can have a decent conversation with his visitors, but tomorrow, it will most likely be forgotten.

1Mexico vet home (2)

We’ve all entered the doors of these sort of places that have ‘that smell’ and I commend this home for not being in that category. And for my Uncle’s sake, I’m much appreciative.

2Mexico vet home (2)

This is a display donated by a previous Missouri governor, Kit Bond. It houses ‘coins’ he collected over the years. I only wish I could have read the card a little better. Basically these are Challenge Coins (the proper name) and are presented to recognize special achievement to military members.

Pictured above: our humble entourage that included my husband (the photographer for these shots) and my mother, aunt and myself. I love the moment captured between my aunt and uncle above. This is her true, genuine, caring, nurturing nature. Love her!

Let us all remember and honor those who have served in the upcoming Season of Giving and be especially thankful for the sacrifices made.

For other Thursday Door entries, please visit Norm 2.0 where you’ll be met with wonderful door posts from around the globe.Just find the blue frog button and click.

Wooldridge and Overton Bottoms/ Thursday Doors

Wooldridge, Missouri was a victim of the Flood of ’93. Driving down into the Overton Bottoms Refuge area (which is adjacent to Wooldridge), it’s hard to get a feel for the volume of water that ran this town into near collapse. This Sign signifies an entrance.

Little muddy 5

The map helps our minds grasp a picture of the area the refuge embodies.

There were still crops to harvest at the time we meandered down this gravel road.

Driving over the tracks, aka city limits.

Wooldridge Mill3 (2)

I didn’t find a lot of information about Wooldridge, Missouri other than the flooding of ’93 and the founder’s name. But I found several moments where I wished for someone to be standing outside that I could have asked a few questions. In the meantime, I leave you with the last photo here of some hidden doors that are behind that semi- trailer.

Sidenote: I found it tough to snap photos of the delapidated places we drove past here. I felt I was nearly intruding on these residents and the conditions some were actually living in. But hindsight has brought me the realization that I should have photographed it for various reasons. One huge reason is for a viewpoint of the lasting impact of natural disasters. Lesson learned. 

For other Thursday Doors entries, check out Norm 2.0 and find the blue frog button on the bottom of his latest Doors post.