Letter M for Milky Way/AtoZ 2019

The April A to Z Challenge is in its tenth year, I’ve now participated for 6 of those years, and this year will be my 3rd quilt theme. It’s my first quilt using only patterns from the Kansas City Star newspaper archives. Welcome to my blog!

If you’re making a whole quilt of this block you may notice that you need to alternate the middle block or ‘star’ from lights to darks to get the desired results. But for this challenge, I needed only to create the one block.

Above you’ll see the yellow and white half-square triangle. In whole quilts that would need to alternate as a blue and white color scheme. (refer to quilt picture above)

Essentially, you have a 9-patch block here. Sewn in 3 rows and finally attached with 2 long seams.

Milky Way Block Completed
Milky Way Block Completed

Did You Know?

In keeping with the era of the 1930’s I’m sharing with you about an astronomer, Robert Julius Trumpler today. He revealed that the size of the Milky Way Galaxy was off. And give us the ‘real’ map of stars and clusters, a way was needed to get a view through that dust. The tool itself wasn’t invented until the 1950’s but, “Thank You!” Trumpler for paving the way!!

Come back here tomorrow for another quilt block for the A to Z Challenge! Also be sure to visit the home of the A to Z here and see other entrants challenge posts. There are excellent writers participating every year with topics in whatever you’re interested in

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Letter L for Maple Leaf/AtoZ 2019

The April A to Z Challenge is in its tenth year, I’ve now participated for 6 of those years, and this year will be my 3rd quilt theme. It’s my first quilt using only patterns from the Kansas City Star newspaper archives. Welcome to my blog!

In 1930, the Kansas City Star said ‘green makes a pretty maple leaf quilt’ That may be, but the maple leaf’s splendor is the colorful display it makes in the fall. Everyone knows that right?? Well if not, look it up.

Half Square Triangles
Half Square Triangles

The colors in this block won’t necessarily reflect the colorful scenes of a forest full of maple trees. But it is going to make a nice addition to the quilt top. Even if I did have to adjust nearly every solid colored square by trimming away 1/4 inch on 2 sides of them. I’m not complaining. But I have to say I never saw this coming when I planned a Kansas City Star quilt project. I wonder what the quilters of days past would have said about these measurement issues? Did they not make samplers??

Image result for eye roll meme

Ok I am complaining.

Just a little adjusting goin’ on around here. If you sew quilts, you’ll see the number this block has played on me by not being correctly published. But it is the way of the A to Z right? Adjust your schedule, time, photos, etc. You get the idea. So maybe this is a life lesson for me. Let me continue to the end. It did work out ok, just shy of an inch.

Maple Leaf Block Completed
Maple Leaf Block Completed

Measuring 11 inches, I present the Maple Leaf block. I will forever remember the trimming and holding my breath til the very end. I salute you quilt professionals out there.

Did You Know?

The Maple Leaf Rag, by Scott Joplin, was published in Sedalia, Missouri in 1899 by a local music store owner, Joh Stark. It became a classic model for ragtime tunes and Sedalians are pretty proud as it holds the annual Scott Joplin Festival each year during the first weekend of June.

Come back here tomorrow for another quilt block for the A to Z Challenge! Also be sure to visit the home of the A to Z here and see other entrants challenge posts. There are excellent writers participating every year with topics in whatever you’re interested in

Letter D for Dutchman’s Puzzle/ AtoZ 2019

The April A to Z Challenge is in its tenth year, I’ve now participated for 6 of those years, and this year will be my 3rd quilt theme. It’s my first quilt using only patterns from the Kansas City Star newspaper archives. Welcome to my blog!

The Dutchman’s Puzzle is basically 8 Flying Geese units arranged in the above style. First published in the 1930 Kansas City Star, I’m pretty sure the method I used from this book was not thought of back then. Thanks to the Star Quilt author for this quick and easy method! Working full-time? This may be a great block for you.

Unfortunately there’s one more sewing step in the above method that I neglected to photograph. In the last step before fully assembling the motifs, you must place one more light block on the top dark corner, draw a line diagonally down the center and sew point to point a 1/4 inch each side of the drawn line, then cut. It gives two more flying geese units- total of 4 with the above method.

Tidying up the block or “squaring it up” is the final step in block making. This gets rid of those ‘dog ears’ (little points on the edge) sticking out and creating unnecessary bulk when you are giving your finished quilt the top stitching of your choice.

Did You Know?

During the 1930’s, the onset of the Great Depression created a revival of sorts in a puzzle craze. Libraries and drug stores offered puzzle rentals for 3 to 10 cents per day.

Come back here tomorrow for another quilt block for the A to Z Challenge! Also be sure to visit the home of the A to Z here and see other entrants challenge posts. There are excellent writers participating every year with topics in whatever you’re interested in.