Fairy Tale Booklet/ Inez’s Clippings

It’s Storytime this Sunday! This mini book was a bonus if you purchased a certain brand of bread back during the Depression Era. It may even be post Depression Era as I could not find much information on this item. The closest thing I found was another booklet with no correct link to its origin. Frustrating–but knowing Grandma’s time frame of collecting clippings, I am tacking on a range from 1925 to 1940 as a possible publishing age. It could even predate this period. Anyone with more information, feel free to correct me or validate my opinion. In the meantime, enjoy this piece from Inez’s Clippings.

The artwork is also a treasure!
The artwork is also a treasure!
The Beginning of the tale
The Beginning of the tale is usually predictable.
The Mistress, the Serving Maid and the Swain (Fiance')
The Mistress, the Serving Maid and the Swain (Fiance’)
Pretty vivid color after all these years in storage.
Pretty vivid color after all these years in storage.
Serving Girl wins in the end
Serving Girl wins in the end
Somehow the Serving Girl ended up with blond hair? We'll blame the printing press. 😉
Somehow the Serving Girl ended up with blond hair? We’ll blame the printing press. 😉
Lots of info to glean from this tiny book but didn't help me much.
Lots of info to glean from this tiny book but that didn’t help me much on the date of publication.

I hope you enjoyed this little fairy tale from the little yellow box containing Inez’s Clippings. And now a favorite quote of mine as I conclude …….

 "There is more treasure in books than in all the pirate's loot on Treasure Island." – Walt Disney              
Advertisements

Letter F for Farmer’s Daughter/ AtoZ 2019

The April A to Z Challenge is in its tenth year, I’ve now participated for 6 of those years, and this year will be my 3rd quilt theme. It’s my first quilt using only patterns from the Kansas City Star newspaper archives. Welcome to my blog!

Did You Know?

In 1935, the Great Depression as well as the event known as the Dust Bowl were in full swing and we weren’t aware we’d made the halfway point here in the MidWest. You don’t hear a lot about my native Missouri and the Dust Bowl, but according to some old-timers I’ve known, we felt the repercussions plenty. Just to give you a little idea of the land value for typical Missouri acreage, I’ve looked at the University of Missouri’s stats and here is how the following years compared:

  • 1920 — An acre valued at $88.
  • 1935 — Same acre valued at $33

The Farmer’s Daughter quilt block is one of the blocks featured in the 1935 Kansas City Star and I’m pretty sure farming was the hottest topic in the MidWest at that time with the future of this vocation in severe dire straits. Kudos to all the quilters of that time trying to keep their chins up by staying creative with their needles and thread.

Lots of color variations possible with this one
Lots of color variations possible with this one

This quilt is about as good as it gets for me personally. Cut, sewn, pressed and it even measured the correct 12-ish inches (You have to allow for those seam allowances as well as squaring up the blocks.) Here’s a little gallery of pics on a portion of the block construction.

Not hard, great for using up scraps and versatile. Can’t ask for more.

Farmer's Daughter Complete
Farmer’s Daughter Complete

Come back here tomorrow for another quilt block for the A to Z Challenge! Also be sure to visit the home of the A to Z here and see other entrants challenge posts. There are excellent writers participating every year with topics in whatever you’re interested in.

Letter D for Dutchman’s Puzzle/ AtoZ 2019

The April A to Z Challenge is in its tenth year, I’ve now participated for 6 of those years, and this year will be my 3rd quilt theme. It’s my first quilt using only patterns from the Kansas City Star newspaper archives. Welcome to my blog!

The Dutchman’s Puzzle is basically 8 Flying Geese units arranged in the above style. First published in the 1930 Kansas City Star, I’m pretty sure the method I used from this book was not thought of back then. Thanks to the Star Quilt author for this quick and easy method! Working full-time? This may be a great block for you.

Unfortunately there’s one more sewing step in the above method that I neglected to photograph. In the last step before fully assembling the motifs, you must place one more light block on the top dark corner, draw a line diagonally down the center and sew point to point a 1/4 inch each side of the drawn line, then cut. It gives two more flying geese units- total of 4 with the above method.

Tidying up the block or “squaring it up” is the final step in block making. This gets rid of those ‘dog ears’ (little points on the edge) sticking out and creating unnecessary bulk when you are giving your finished quilt the top stitching of your choice.

Did You Know?

During the 1930’s, the onset of the Great Depression created a revival of sorts in a puzzle craze. Libraries and drug stores offered puzzle rentals for 3 to 10 cents per day.

Come back here tomorrow for another quilt block for the A to Z Challenge! Also be sure to visit the home of the A to Z here and see other entrants challenge posts. There are excellent writers participating every year with topics in whatever you’re interested in.