Next Stop, Wamego/ThursdayDoors

I’m happy to report I still have more of the Kansas Quilt Trail to share with you. This road trip back in July was plentiful in doors too thankfully. I’ll have unorthodox quilt blocks included. But to keep it simple, I decided to break up the Wamego, Kansas discoveries into a couple of posts.

I wonder if you'll get a hint of what Wamego is famous for from this photo?
I wonder if you’ll get a hint of what Wamego is famous for from this photo?(A tad bit blurry)

I won’t keep you in suspense for long. Ya’ll got places to go, people to see, blogs to read. So one main attraction for a lot of new visitors is the Wizard of Oz Museum.

Thankful for Pinterest for this car-free view
Thankful for Pinterest for this car-free view

My pics will follow of our little jaunt past the museum. No indoor pics, sorry. The reason there’s an Oz museum in Wamego? Why Not?! At least that’s what they say to this question. It’s the largest Oz collection on public display in the world. And what better place than a small Kansas town to host it?!

The blocks of concrete were cool, but the little Toto’s were even better.

Aren’t they sweet ?? We figured good enough for an Instagram-ish photo prop….

If you ever find yourself in Wamego, there is a lot to do there. We found these posters along our walk.

Although our Kansas Quilt Trail drive was a pretty quick one day tour, we learned there is plenty to drive back for another time. Very helpful, Wamego!

Thanks for visiting! I hope you’ll take a few to drop in at Norm 2.0 for directions to many more Thursday Doors posts!

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Uncle Neal/Inez’sClippings

This little clipping reminds me of the time I was letting a table of preschoolers use scissors. The plan was to ‘feed the monster’, a shoe box decorated with a monster face with an opening for his mouth in which the children were to put paper ‘cuttings’ into his mouth. Cutting with scissors is such a huge developmental milestone and it is not something that comes naturally.

But for one little boy(we’ll call him Abe), cutting was his strength. Abe was so into the activity that he started growling to the monster. Happy to encourage his imagination, I went along with it as did the other children around the table. After all, our scissors were safety scissors so not worried about them cutting their clothing and we had much prior discussion on never cutting hair. Much to my surprise, Abe reached across the table and snipped the finger of one of the little girls, creating instant screaming and panic. He had succeeded in snipping her finger enough to warrant a phone call to the parents as I wasn’t quite sure amid the bloodshed and extreme tears whether it needed stitches or not. All ended well. Thank heavens mom was a nurse.

These days, we feed the monster with torn paper.

Sharing some of my week in photos to finish off this week’s Inez’s Clippings. Have a wonderful first week of autumn!!

Addition

Just as I was about to hit Publish on Monday morning, I got a phone call from mother. My uncle had passed overnight. Only son, brother, bachelor, uncle, cousin and Vietnam Vet to the Hunter clan. Before we lay him to rest this morning, I found an additional clipping in the Inez stash and I wanted to share it. I visualize her and her loving personality with her only son as I read it. I have posted about Neal before here. Rest in Peace Uncle Neal!

Calamities/ThursdayDoors

This was quite the week for the whole family.

  • Youngest daughter learned of her car eventually needing a new engine and warranty won’t cover it until it actually fails. This is pretty frustrating.
  • Eldest daughter was without electricity for 8 hours, hot water for 4 days, and then internet and cable were cut accidentally during repair of said hot water issue.
  • A ‘trustee’,aka convict, escaped from the Missouri State Fairgrounds who house these people to clean and work around the fairgrounds when most folks are in bed. (More on this in a bit)
  • And finally, the husband was in the hospital with afib and released Wednesday evening after a battery of doctors coming in an out with differing opinions. The VA is good at that. No offense. I could go on about this too but I will refrain.

First the Doors…

Double Door in the ICU -- Columbia, MO VA Hospital
Double Door in the ICU — Columbia, MO VA Hospital

Ron I’m happy to say has lost 80 pounds in the last couple years. But much of it is due to 4 stomach surgeries that involved removing tumors that have been bleeding. Thankfully they are benign, But if they keep returning it will involve a more involved surgery. This is a direct result of dismantling too many meth labs while in law enforcement before they really understood what the effects of meth were. I am very proud of my husband’s service in law enforcement. He fought the good fight. I know of many who are not so good, sadly.

My opinion is probably not appreciated
My opinion is probably not appreciated

With all that about the hubby’s career out there, you can summize that I know a few people in our local law enforcement community. There are many aware of my daycare that has been here since 1995, on the Katy Trail. I can only think that they felt I was in good hands with my husband’s presence and I didn’t need to be notified. Guess what?! He may not have actually been here. A simple phone call or text would have been greatly appreciated as I took it upon myself to do a self-directed lock down after my mother-in-law and a neighbor’s mother notified me. (Thank you both!) And oh, by the way, he was apprehended on the Katy Trail, albeit in the opposite direction. I’m pretty peeved at the whole incident. This is the not the first time the trail has been used by escapees.

Thank you to anyone who read the whole paragraph. I will not get on my soapbox any further. At least not today 😉

To conclude today’s late Thursday Doors entry, I’ll ask you to please take a moment or two to visit Norm 2.0 and see all the week’s door entries, beginning with Norm. It’s a wonderful group of people and they won’t disappoint. Following with some blooms of the week from the garden.

Pepper Chicken/Inez’s Clippings

It’s Sunday and time for another one of Inez’s Clippings. Grandma was often the butcher at the farm. It was nothing for her to head out to the chicken barn and grab a good looking hen (or rooster who was guilty of being too ornery) and take care of business –all the steps including plucking the feathers and readying it for the dinner table. I was never privy to learn the method as I was not considered old enough. I can honestly say I’m ok with that 😉 I saw enough meat prep of all kinds to satisfy my curiosity.

On a recent doctor visit, I was told to eat less red meats in an attempt to lower the cholesterol. I’m guilty of being an honest to goodness carnevore and his instructions are going to be tough. After all we live in the middle of the Farm Belt and I reitterate the fact that meat is my favorite staple.

So with all that in mind, we used up some garden produce this weekend, starting with some lovely sweet bell peppers in a Pepper Chicken dish. Chicken is on the ‘good’ list. As long as it’s not deep fried.

The step-by-step photos are in the slides below. Notes: #1-We double recipes sometimes so we can have leftovers and use up extra summer vegies. #2-The link for the recipe is here. #3-The recipe states beef and as I stated above, we substituted chicken. #4-Another difference is we added julienned celery. Crunch is important….to us at least.

  • Our rice is cooked in beef broth. Chicken or vegetable broth works too. FYI the beef broth is cholesterol free
  • Mushrooms are sauted first. This is not on the website's ingredient list.
  • Adding the peppers and onions next.
  • The sauce is whisked and ready to add later
  • Vegies removed temporarily to cook up the chicken
  • Reintroduce the vegies and add sauce

To keep this gluten free, it’s important to watch soy sauce, oyster sauce and spice labels.

Plated Pepper Chicken Stir-Fry

Thanks for dropping in this Sunday!

Kansas Quilt Trail/ThursdayDoors

July 4th weekend we decided to meet up at the eldest daughter’s place for some home-cooked vittles before starting out on a long day trip.

 Out the window we caught a glimpse of this rainbow.  Bye Bye rain!
Out the window we caught a glimpse of this rainbow. Bye Bye rain!

We enjoyed eggs, bacon, hash browns and toast—not to mention some ‘pour-over’ coffee. You know, I do believe she payed attention to my cooking tips. 😉 Click on photos to see ‘Captions”.

About the drive…..we headed off after this supercharge breakfast on the Kansas Quilt Trail. Here’s a portion of the map.

Starting point for us was Lawrence, Kansas
Starting point for us was Lawrence, Kansas

As beginners, we learned that there are no warnings of quilt blocks coming up. The map is just a general reference and you must be on the lookout for them. GPS markers would really help if anyone has the ambition to enter them(clears throat). In the next few Thursday Doors, I’ll be sharing our experience. To start here is a little taste of western Kansas.

And for my finale, an official door to make this a proper Thursday Doors entry. Hope everyone takes a little time out to visit Norm 2.0 where there are so many more beautiful doors. He’ll direct your path.

On the Road to the Kansas Quilt Trail
On the Road to the Kansas Quilt Trail

The Water Dipper/ Inez’s Clippings

First the clipping….

The Water Jug

In case you are unaware, a “Hane” is a piece of iron attached to the collar of draft horses pulling a wagon. Water jugs were the way to transport water back in the day before the beginning of the Convenience Store. No water bottles, Tervis’s, Thermos bottles, etc. And everyone shared from the same container. Germs? No there were no germophobes in existence. At least not in our neck of the woods.

But we didn’t have a water jug per say. We had a metal dipper. It hung by grandma’s sink and anytime you needed a good swig of water, just grab it and fill it up. That fresh well water pumped right to the sink was ice cold and always hit the spot. Ice cubes? Nah. The only time you needed ice was in your tea or when you were making ice cream.

I searched high and low for a photograph showing that enamel covered metal dipper. After all, the kitchen was always the gathering place for the women folk. We kids knew exactly where they’d all be hanging out. But I only found a couple photos of the kitchen and they’re not taken at the correct angle so you can’t see the infamous dipper. But I want you to see the photo I found anyway as it shows a Norman Rockwell-ish moment in 1969 with my mother reading and Great Grandma sitting while resting her feet. In the kitchen with no tv, no radio, no cell phones, no computers. Just togetherness.

My mother Eileen and Great Grandma Hunter
My mother Eileen and Great Grandma Hunter

The German Table/Thursday Doors

Returning this week to Thursday Doors posts. Just want to say I’ve missed the Thursday Doors gang but I’m glad I participated in the A to Z again just the same. Couldn’t miss its 10th anniversary now could I? If you’re curious about my contribution, you may click the 2019 AtoZ tab above to see the posts. There will be a reveal for the Reflections post that hopefully includes my sampler quilt top. Look for it May 6.

So we had a surprise birthday party for the brother-in-law. And the location couldn’t have been more charming. You might drive by it if you’re not looking goin’ down Missouri state highway 52.

Before the honoree arrived, I got a shot of these farmhouse style tables. Bestill my heart!! Oh, and there’s the inside door view.

The ambiance was wonderful, food was outstanding and no complaints on service. The only thing lacking was the company of a couple of our children…..my niece(& her hubby) and my eldest. But already making plans for a return when everyone is back home. Til then, I’ll share the rest of the photos for this Thursday Doors from Cole Camp, Missouri.

Did I mention the dessert??!! Bavarian Cream filled and layered German Chocolate cake. Oh my Word!! No pics to taunt you with but I’ll be trying the duplication of this one. No doubt about it!

Crazy Anne/ AtoZ 2019

The April A to Z Challenge is in its tenth year, I’ve now participated for 6 of those years, and this year will be my 3rd quilt theme. It’s my first quilt using only patterns from the Kansas City Star newspaper archives. Welcome to my blog!

This block from 1932 has a fitting title. It seems to go in all directions. And the author neglected a tad bit on the instructions on this one. I ended up fudging it just in time for publishing. close call.

Crazy Anne Completed
Crazy Anne Comleted

And for your viewing pleasure, I’m giving you the final block without too much hoopla. That’s because I’m ready to share with those Hunter family members of mine who are interested, a little gem I found from the January 1932 edition of the Missouri Historical Review. I found the perfect family trait that we can relate to (no pun intended.)

Did You Know?

Nancy Ann Hunter, daughter of Scotch/Irish immigrants, Heroine of the American Revolutionary War, was a young girl when her family moved to help establish a fort at ‘Clark’s Colony’ or Fort Jefferson. The expedition under George Rogers Clark was unsuccessful but the Hunter family stayed and lived in a hostile environment anyway until abandonment in 1781. The story concerning Nancy goes like this: While a period of extreme food shortage was underway, the fort found itself in a dilemma concerning a cow and her new calf on the outside with hostile native indians and the fort occupants trying to decide who would go save these animals. Nancy apparently took it upon herself to do it while said discussions were in still progress. She ran, retrieved the calf and ran back all the while being shot at by the hidden Indians. Clothes a little tattered by near misses of the arrows, she was unharmed. She earned her title from this act of bravery/ or crazy scheme in some minds. In my point of view, this last block for the AtoZ 2019 befits such bravery to a fellow Hunter. Proud to share the namesake!!

Thank you so much to my visitors this A to Z 2019! To the hosts, thanks to all your support and hard work to make this 10th year such a success for us all. Plus, be sure to visit the home of the A to Z here and see other entrants challenge posts. I’ll certainly be spending lots of time visiting the blogs I missed, returning to the ones I got behind on and hopefully submitting a finished quilt top by the time the AtoZ Road Trip rolls around this year.

Starting My Bucket List/ThursdayDoors

Last week’s family history dive was brought to you courtesy of my father’s side of the family tree. There’s quite a bit we’ve learned following the grandparents and great grands but I’ll be keeping that under wraps for a bit. Maybe I’ll find a few more doors to go along with that storyline. For this Thursday Doors, I’m starting a bucket list of doors I want to see related to Mother’s side of the family. I won’t go too in-depth but the one I’m sharing today is pretty darn cool if you ask me.

Hunterston Castle in Scotland is still standing!
Hunterston Castle in Scotland is still standing!

The last Laird (#17) of Hunterston is Robert Huntar and so to my family who reads this, yes, our name spelling is different compared to then. A long lineage of Hunters who were extremely good at hunting, thus given the name as well as land and did the hunting for the kingdom/royalty of those times. I sure wish I could tell my grandfather this! He was the epitame of a hunter in every way, shape and form. Little did we know it was truly in our gene pool!

Family Coat of Arms
Family Coat of Arms

Thankful to have found this information to pass on for the generations to come. And given the chance, it’s definitely at the top of the places I want to see in person. Maybe they’ll give me a grand tour being I’m related 🙂

For a tour of many more Thursday Doors entries, please click here and visit Norm 2.0. He’ll explain where to find the blue frog.

Mt. Olive Baptist Church/ThursdayDoors

Down this road from Bethlehem Baptist Church

Leaving Bethlehem Baptist Church
Leaving Bethlehem Baptist Church

in which my great great grandfather was a charter member,

Windmill and Missouri Barns
Windmill and Missouri Barns

and past this farm,

you’ll come to Mt. Olive Baptist Church. It was here that my grandfather was ordained as a minister in 1886. He was 39 years of age at the time and served as a pastor here 2 different times. The Versailles Statesman published that as of 1927, he’d married 125 couples, as well as conducted 225 funerals. I wonder how there could have survived all these years 2 Baptist churches so close to each other. This one was originally a log school house but burned and was rebuilt by 1914. It sure wasn’t a good-paying occupation as in 1912 the salary was $100.00 per year, payed by the quarter. No wonder they had to farm as well as be pretty much indispensable for weddings and funerals,
prayer meetings, Sunday School, Sunday services and don’t forget the Revivals and Camp Meetings. Not to mention offering various sorts of family counseling for the sick or homebound, marriage counseling, excessive alcohol consumption or treatment of family or neighbors — some of these you certainly didn’t discuss in those days. Such a full time job for so little. As you ponder these things, I hope you’ll enjoy the rest of the photos we took as we wandered around the church yard.

Early Photo
Early Photo published in Florence, Missouri’s 160th Celebration. (glad I bought the book back in ’92)

For other Thursday Doors, please visit Norm 2.0 and he’ll guide you to the list of wonderful doors around the world.