Dog Trot/Thursday Doors

Thursday Doors is going to be more pics and less writing this week. I have a wonderful gem from Clinton, Missouri to share and the history behind it as well. Thankfully it is all written out and all I had to do is snap a few photos. Hope you enjoy the shots and the wonderful story told on the front door of this possibly-earlier-than-1856 Dog Trot.

Photos first, then the story later.
Wild Roses are perfect along this window. Love them!
Wild Roses are perfect along this window. Love them!
Looking up at the ceiling between the east and west wings.

Doors and what’s considered the original portion of the Dog Trot.

More buildings around the property…

There was no mention of the Bell’s history. The ‘use what we have’ mentality is evident in the way they attached it to the logs.

Old Bell

Before you head off to visit Norm 2.0 and all the other wonderful Door Enthusiasts, here is the story behind the Dog Trot. Thanks so much for your visit!

Historical Account Part 1
Historical Account Part 1
Historical Account part 2
Historical Account part 2
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Rocheport 2019/Thursday Doors

Maybe you’ve been keeping up with all the rainy weather, storms, and flooding. Or maybe you’ve been ignoring the news. Or you are just possibly living on an island separated from all cares in the world. Whatever the case may be, I’ve some watery pics this week of the Missouri River out of its banks…. again.

Living in low-lying areas, bottoms as we refer to them here, one expects some flooding. But with these massive events you can’t help but to be in total awe of Mother Nature. There are so many affected this year that it boggles the mind. Our thoughts and prayers to all in these areas no matter which part of the world you’re in.

In the meantime, I hope you can enjoy the beauty found in the scenes captured by my daughter this past Tuesday afternoon.

First - The Door, and an alpaca quilt block. Daughter looks out for my best interests :-)
First – The Door, and an alpaca quilt block. Daughter looks out for my best interests 🙂

And hoping this video will work.

Rocheport, Missouri June 4, 2019

Thursday Doors comes to you through Norm 2.0 every Thursday. We join him by adding our own set of doors each week. Please take a couple minutes to visit Norm and a few of the other participants for some wonderful door views from around the world.

Tightwad/ Thursday Doors

Tightwad, Missouri is a ‘don’t blink or you’ll miss it’ town along scenic highway 7; population 64 according to 2010 census. It’s an hour drive from my home depending on the time of year. ‘Lake traffic’ is all I gotta say about that.

The attraction for me was to present to you the Bank of Tightwad. In its prime it was boasting clients from all over the world. What better way to pay off a debt than with a check from Tightwad Bank? But in actuality there were a lot more novelty accounts than big $$ accounts so it closed its doors in 2006.

The Bank Time
The Bank Time
Tightwad Bank
Tightwad Bank

If you drive past the bank you can imagine how easy it was for the success of numerous robberies that occurred here. It’s a fairly remote location, on a major highway, with acres and acres of lake, access to boating ramps and docks and other side roads that lead to God’s country. Wouldn’t take a genius to figure this out. Not to mention a lack of law enforcement to deter these incidents. I mean, if I can imagine it, I’m pretty sure Anyone can.

Back Door of Tightwad Bank
Back Door of Tightwad Bank
Incinerating instead of shredding documents seems pretty good to me!
Incinerating instead of shredding documents seems pretty good to me!
Fire Department across the street
Fire Department across the street

  The town of Tightwad reportedly received its name from a tale of a postman that, on his route, asked a farmer to save him a watermelon that he’d pick up when he was finished delivering the day’s mail.

When he returned to collect his melon, he learned that the farmer had sold it to someone else for 50 cents more than their agreed price. Enraged, the postal carrier loudly called the farmer a “tightwad” and continued to do so every day after that.

Fire danger is rated "moderate" at the time I snapped this picture across the street from the bank.
Fire danger is rated “moderate” at the time I snapped this picture across the street from the bank.

Thursday Doors comes to you through Norm 2.0 every Thursday. We join his company by adding our own set of doors each week. Please take a couple minutes to visit him and a few of the other participants for some wonderful door views from around the world.

Barrett Avenue/Thursday Doors

On our way down Barrett Avenue one evening we were searching for possibilities for Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors challenge. There were several but this one caught our eye and as you can see, it was great timing. Good weather omen we hope.

Arched blue door - Barrett Avenue
Arched blue door -Barrett Avenue

We couldn’t have planned it better with the beautiful rays of sunshine the camera captured. Now a little more on this street name.

Augustus M. Barrett was one of Sedalia, Missouri’s founding fathers being a prominent banker who would have been involved in the buying and selling of parcels of land. He died in 1852 and is buried in Crown Hill Cemetery.

Thanks for visiting and please be sure and stop in at Norm 2.0 by clicking here for more great captures of doors from around the world.

Calaboose/Thursday Doors

Calaboose
kaluh-boos, kal-uhboos ] Definition: Noun Slang. jail; prison; lockup.

Today’s Thursday Doors is another donation project of which I am always grateful. The youngest daughter is my enabler this week, along with her bestie/cousin’s girlfriend/future cousin.

Not wanting to prolong the post this week as I have a kazillion things calling, I’ll cut to the chase. The pictures following are from Springfield, Missouri of an old 1891 police sub-station; nicknamed ‘Calaboose’.

Wow. This is the first time WordPress has allowed me to caption all photos in the new editor! Sorry, got sidetracked there. It’s the small things sometimes.

The sign will tell you that it’s a police museum but was closed at the time. Might be a future stop for them? Bet it has a few gems inside!

Make your stop over at Norm 2.0 for more fabulous Thursday Door entries. Wonderful entries from all over!

More Paris, Not France/ThursdayDoors

Paris Public Library
Paris Public Library

Continuing my drive through Paris, Missouri from last week’s Thursday Doors. The engraving on the library above reads “In Memory of Wm H & Susan Van Zandt Dulaney. Interesting fact: Norman Rockwell made a Paris, Missouri native the main subject of one of his paintings. Had I known this, I would have found the county courthouse to see a copy on display.

Corner Doors Plus One Bonus
Corner Doors Plus one bonus

Tucked down town on a side street was this little corner door set. Lots of personality with the lampost, bonus door down the side and matching awnings. What’s not to love?

An old hardware store circa 1881
An old hardware store circa 1881
Zoomed In for the details
Zoomed In for the details

According to my research this door was once a fishing and hunting surplus store. That is so typical of Missouri!

You can almost hear the screen door slam
You can almost hear the screen door slam.

Too bad about that broken window. I don’t know what it is, but once there’s one window broken, the rest soon follow I’ve noticed in old buildings. Irritates me to no end! I really liked the screen door and the 3 windows above balancing it all.

Lemonade sippin' porch
Lemonade sippin’ porch

I hope you enjoyed this Thursday Doors post and are able to drop in over at Norm 2.0 for many more doors posts. You’ll see doors from all over the world.

Paris, But Not France/Thursday Doors

First Baptist Church, Paris, Missouri
First Baptist Church, Paris, Missouri

What more could you ask for? A Mustang convertible, sunny day, and front door parking at church?! This is how we roll in Rural Missouri! Don’t get too worked up, it was on a Saturday. 😉 Now, if only I could revisit and see the inside of the door trio. Maybe next time we’re in Paris, Missouri, population 1,220. It’s located north of Mexico, Missouri, in the Northeastern part of the state and was settled in 1831. More photos from this sleepy town next week.

For more Thursday Door pics, please head over to Norm 2.0 and he’ll direct you to all the doors from around the world.

Jayhawk Road/ Thursday Doors

Hopefully you enjoy the perspectives I’ve tried to display here. Doors are not always the easiest things to capture and here are some examples.

It’s not uncommon to see an old farm split by a road. In this case you add a pretty good curve where they’ve clearly painted double yellow lines to remind you it’s not a good idea ever to pass, much less stop and take a door photo.

White Barn with assorted cattle gates.

Here’s the closest you’ll get without the steering wheel or hubby’s head in the way. Not to mention the tinted side windows aren’t very conducive to picture-taking.

Barn, Garage, and Farmhouse Doors
Barn, Garage, and Farmhouse Doors

As you can see, Houston,we have a problem. The hood is factor #1. And there’s the issue of the cracked windshield #2. The space between that home and myself is #3. Around here, you just don’t go driving up a private drive even when most folks are pretty neighborly. There are factors like Meth manufacturer’s who try finding hiding places off the beaten path to make said meth, dogs who may or may not be friendly, and shotguns owned by the farmers trying to protect themselves. So…….

Filtered and Cropped
Filtered and Cropped

I’ll be using the cropping (no pun intended, dear farmers) and filtering available. You see, once a few years ago before I had shared in Thursday Doors, the hubby and I were driving down a road back home and were literally chased down by a farmer who didn’t recognize us. We pulled over, showed him my camera, the child in the back seat and did some name-dropping of “my people”. Once I explained who I was related to the area we were in, and then told him I was writing a blog post about barns in the county, he simmered down…. kind of. He clearly was a bit on the mistrustful and hostile side of the spectrum.

Another farm in the creek bottoms.
Another farm in the creek bottoms

And you can’t tell from here, but it’s split by the road as well.

Clapboard sided farm house
Clapboard sided farm house

It’s sometimes a choice of which side of the road you photograph. We were between destinations with not a lot of sunlight left to play with so turning around was not in the cards that day. Guess we’ll have to take another drive sometime.

If you have some door photos you’d like to share, try checking out Norm 2.0 and he’ll direct your path.

Mt. Olive Baptist Church/ThursdayDoors

Down this road from Bethlehem Baptist Church

Leaving Bethlehem Baptist Church
Leaving Bethlehem Baptist Church

in which my great great grandfather was a charter member,

Windmill and Missouri Barns
Windmill and Missouri Barns

and past this farm,

you’ll come to Mt. Olive Baptist Church. It was here that my grandfather was ordained as a minister in 1886. He was 39 years of age at the time and served as a pastor here 2 different times. The Versailles Statesman published that as of 1927, he’d married 125 couples, as well as conducted 225 funerals. I wonder how there could have survived all these years 2 Baptist churches so close to each other. This one was originally a log school house but burned and was rebuilt by 1914. It sure wasn’t a good-paying occupation as in 1912 the salary was $100.00 per year, payed by the quarter. No wonder they had to farm as well as be pretty much indispensable for weddings and funerals,
prayer meetings, Sunday School, Sunday services and don’t forget the Revivals and Camp Meetings. Not to mention offering various sorts of family counseling for the sick or homebound, marriage counseling, excessive alcohol consumption or treatment of family or neighbors — some of these you certainly didn’t discuss in those days. Such a full time job for so little. As you ponder these things, I hope you’ll enjoy the rest of the photos we took as we wandered around the church yard.

Early Photo
Early Photo published in Florence, Missouri’s 160th Celebration. (glad I bought the book back in ’92)

For other Thursday Doors, please visit Norm 2.0 and he’ll guide you to the list of wonderful doors around the world.

Ice Storm 2019/ThursdayDoors

A Throwback event was planned by my husband and I for our daughters. We bought them tickets for Christmas and the event was held last Friday evening in Kansas City. But as you can see from some photos below, we were kinda worried if we’d get to make it there. Ice is the worst! Can’t stress it enough. There’s nothing moving, unless it’s you falling on your rump or other body parts that happen to land first. Such as my youngest hitting her head on the pavement headed to work. So glad she wasn’t hurt badly! Scary stuff and not the best part of living in the Midwest.

The Throwback Event as I have dubbed it was a concert to see Sara Evans who happens to be a Missouri-born country music singer in case you weren’t aware. Three of us met the eldest daughter at the Ameristar Casino to see the show. We took a couple prints of the 2002 pic below along for autographing.

Sara Evans with my girls at the 2002 Missouri State Fair.
Sara Evans with my girls at the 2002 Missouri State Fair.

Little did we know we’d get to take another photo or 2. They’re all grown up now clearly and this mom is feeling all sappy and stuff. My how time flies. Some song lyrics from Born to Fly:
Hey, ’cause I will soar away like the blackbird
I will blow in the wind like a seed
I will plant my heart in the garden of my dreams
And I will grow up where I want, wild and free
 
Who doesn’t want this for their children? Some more photos below of the fam and some doors that are the best I could do with an icy parking lot on the outside. I.Don’t. Skate.

” Hope you’ll take some time to visit other Thursday Door posts at Norm 2.0 and have a wonderful Valentine’s Day!