Hinerville School/ThursdayDoors

Mother, her brother and sisters attended a one-room schoolhouse back in their childhood days. My grandmother was a one-room schoolhouse teacher for a good portion of her twenties. And my own experiences in a one room schoolhouse that housed our local 4-Her’s, offered a place to have ice cream socials, drew in folks for community dinners as well as accomodated the location of my first bridal shower gives these places a big chunk of my heart. So I was happy to find this well-kept school on K-99 right before we were ready to head back to Lawrence on I-70. It was a perfect ending to our long drive on the Kansas Quilt Trail. I hope you enjoy my picture version of personal nostalgia this Thursday Doors.

View across from the schoolhouse—the gated community, rural American style.

I somehow seem to find these ‘Paw Paw’ roads

It’s been my experience that there were little kitchenettes in either the front or rear of these schools. I’d say this one was inside that back door. Notice the chimney often used for heating with a potbelly stove.

Side View

Where asphalt and gravel meet.

Another cattle gate
I would’ve rather rode a pony to school personally.

Brownie points if you’ve ever had to scrape your boots off on those metal devices before.

Hand hewn front step

Thanks for your kind attention this week as I shared this old piece of 1800’s history. Please take time and visit our Doors host, Norm 2.0 and he’ll direct you to more doors from all over the world.

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Kansas State Highway 99/ThursdayDoors

Traveling down K-99 towards I-70 (also known as the Road to Oz) we veered off the Kansas Quilt Trail. But we still enjoyed the charm of billowing clouds, rural farm scenes and just the way wide open spaces rest my eyes.

I'd love to see the view from that hayloft!
I’d love to see the view from that hayloft!

Windy is a normal thing for Kansas and maybe you can tell by the clouds how turbulent the air was that day. But not in the tornadic sense of the word, thankfully. It was actually very good weather to be outdoors for a Midwest day in July.

How many bales of hay have passed through these barn doors over the years?!
How many bales of hay have passed through these barn doors over the years?!

Hope you enjoyed this Thursday Doors post. Please take time to visit Norm 2.0 for more doors from all over. He’ll let you know where to find them. Have a wonderful weekend!!

Next Stop, Wamego/ThursdayDoors

I’m happy to report I still have more of the Kansas Quilt Trail to share with you. This road trip back in July was plentiful in doors too thankfully. I’ll have unorthodox quilt blocks included. But to keep it simple, I decided to break up the Wamego, Kansas discoveries into a couple of posts.

I wonder if you'll get a hint of what Wamego is famous for from this photo?
I wonder if you’ll get a hint of what Wamego is famous for from this photo?(A tad bit blurry)

I won’t keep you in suspense for long. Ya’ll got places to go, people to see, blogs to read. So one main attraction for a lot of new visitors is the Wizard of Oz Museum.

Thankful for Pinterest for this car-free view
Thankful for Pinterest for this car-free view

My pics will follow of our little jaunt past the museum. No indoor pics, sorry. The reason there’s an Oz museum in Wamego? Why Not?! At least that’s what they say to this question. It’s the largest Oz collection on public display in the world. And what better place than a small Kansas town to host it?!

The blocks of concrete were cool, but the little Toto’s were even better.

Aren’t they sweet ?? We figured good enough for an Instagram-ish photo prop….

If you ever find yourself in Wamego, there is a lot to do there. We found these posters along our walk.

Although our Kansas Quilt Trail drive was a pretty quick one day tour, we learned there is plenty to drive back for another time. Very helpful, Wamego!

Thanks for visiting! I hope you’ll take a few to drop in at Norm 2.0 for directions to many more Thursday Doors posts!

Dwight in Stone/ThursdayDoors

Still have a little collection left from Dwight, Kansas. Before I get started, just thought I’d share that this little town is on the old Rock Island railroad line. This rail ran just south of Sedalia, Missouri, my town back in the day as well. And so, for a little fun, I’m sharing Johnny Cash’s tribute song for the rail line before we get into the photos.

Did you know Johnny Cash could play a banjo too??? Of course I would know 🙂

Some boarded up doors for what used to be the entrance to a native stone building. The signage reads that it is or once was a heating and cooling business.

Not a stone building but the style is symbolic of those days gone by.

Full view includes 2 doors

Being an old bank left us wondering if there was a cool old vault inside. Now that would have taken this one to the next level.

Hope you’ve enjoyed the trek through Dwight the last few Thursday Doors. I appreciate your visit. Stop by Norm 2.0 for a wide array of door enthusiasts by clicking here.

Trading Post /ThursdayDoors

For a town smaller than my hometown, population 272, I sure came out with a heap of photos. Dwight, Kansas did not disappoint. Besides the quilt blocks we found, there was this wonderful find. (By the way, there won’t be a quilt block in this round of Thursday Doors)

Free or Exchanged food pantry
Free or Exchanged food pantry

I zoomed in on the details next.

Good citizenship
Good citizenship

No matter where you live, there are people suffering hard times. It’s a good feeling to know that help is available to those who may feel embarrassed in asking. For those with more than they need, giving is a good example to show your children.

Another door for good measure
Another door for good measure

Another Round of Dwight,KS/ThursdayDoors

Happy Friday! This Thursday Doors I’m sharing a couple churches in Dwight, Kansas where we found yet more quilt blocks. I won’t elaborate it in too many words being a day late to enter my post. Unexpected drive yesterday to the hospital with the hubster put things in a slight disarray–but happy to say I think we’re getting back on course around here.

Double blue doors and another side storm door. Appears additions were made at intervals and I have to wonder if it was always a church. No I couldn’t find information on this one at all.

And apparently we neglected to get a sign photo of this one completely.

Caught a glimpse of another block in the grass but didn’t notice it until we got home. Bummer. Hope you enjoyed the continuing Kansas Quilt Trail portion of Thursday Doors. Please take a few moments to visit the wide array of doors hosted by Norm 2.0 by clicking here. Have a wonderful weekend!!

Dwight, Kansas on the KQT/ThursdayDoors

The Kansas Quilt Trail (KQT) meanders through Dwight, Kansas and I have a quilt block close to my heart this week. I don’t know how many of you know of or have a history with 4-H, but it is the focus for this week’s block find.

But before we discovered the little quiet town of Dwight, we passed more farmland with barns and farm houses aplenty. Here’s one set of pics I hope gives you an idea of the scenery we drove by.

Dwight is definitely Rural America and I say that with great fondness! I had Ron driving around here quite a bit. Thankfully we weren’t stopped and questioned with all the photos I took. But it was clearly an old railroad town and understandably so with the grain elevators next to the tracks.

The last set of photos is an old Masonic Lodge which I looked up and it appears to have folded in the last few years. Lodge AF & AM No.374 was not on the roster of Kansas lodges. I do believe it may house a 4-H club though with the significant quilt block on the front to give me the huge clue. As a past 4-H’er and 4-H project leader of crochet, sewing, early childhood and cooking, I’m always thrilled to see the clubs alive and well! I hope you’ll encourage anyone interested if you have the opportunity. Great memories made there!

So, can’t get enough of Thursday Doors? Head on over to Norm 2.0 for more entries from around the world. He’s happy to direct your path!

Kansas Quilt Trail Pt.5 /ThursdayDoors

We drove a significant amount of miles covering the Kansas Quilt Trail, so the story continues this week.

Some Condensed History
Some Condensed History

Keeping it condensed because that’s my delivery style, but I plan on giving you a zoomed-in photo or 2 to see what the kiosk above had to say.

I am back-tracking a bit with the museum photo above, but we’re still in Wabaunsee County so it’ll work out fine. The ghost town of Volland was off our planned route but I’d like to go back and see it in person someday. All pics included in the ‘doors’ category naturally.

Barn with "Curved Windmill" Quilt Block. I could have cropped more sky away but I like the wide open feel.
Barn with “Curved Windmill” Quilt Block. I could have cropped more sky away but I like the wide open feel.

It has been such a wet spring, the farmers haven’t had any trouble at all getting an early hay crop. Some are predicting a very cold winter…. I’ll have my persimmon report in a few days. Hope you check back for the results.

A variation of the Pinwheel Quilt Block
A variation of the Pinwheel Quilt Block
Sunburst Variation. So Kansas-appropriate!
Sunburst Variation. So Kansas-appropriate!
An Arrow Crown variety to the left and a Square in a Square to the right.
An Arrow Crown variety to the left and a Square in a Square to the right.

That’ll do it for this week’s entry in Thursday Doors. Thank you so much for dropping in! Please take a few minutes and visit Norm 2.0 for more wonderful doors from around the world. There’s not a better group of door contributors out there!

Kansas Quilt Trail-Fences/ThursdayDoors

Well the title tells enough–but I’m still giving you more details this week as I continue on the quilt trail through south-central Kansas. This may well be another instance of dividing up the photos so I don’t drown you with them all at once. I rather like the soaking up of a small number at a time. And with blog challenges, most folks are trying to read several leaving little time for long, laborious posts.

And btw, lesson learned on captioning. It needs to show on the photo or directly underneath it. It just isn’t enough to click a photo to read the caption on a separate page. At least that has become my experience with readers. And again, I get it. Busy people require ease of reading. Let us hope WordPress ‘gets it’ pretty soon. I mean, how many times has the newspaper format changed?! Enhanced reader appeal still needs the basics. Don’t worry, this is my last rant on the topic. I doubt this little spiel will change a darn thing.

 Mandatory Door photo inserted here.
Mandatory Door photo inserted here.

Native stone home. New windows and roof keep it going another century I hope.

This was just past the town of Alma a few miles. Lots of rolling hills and then this roadside touristy spot.

The stone fence.
The stone fence.

I’ve read a fair amount on the Dust Bowl years and I’d venture to say this fence saw a lot of change over the last 100+ years. So thankful that tragedy is long gone and this part of history was preserved. Kind of surprised it wasn’t mentioned in the reading above though. Some close-up pics next.

Ranching is not for the faint of heart. Weather events, ample hay/grass and water are just the tip of the iceburg in success or failure. They have my complete regard!

Panoramic view
Panoramic view

And with a view like this every morning, I’d be spellbound for sure. Just spectacular!

So, can’t get enough of Thursday Doors? Head on over to Norm 2.0 for more entries from around the world. He’s happy to direct your path!

Kansas Quilt Trail Part.3 –ThursdayDoors

When I told a fellow quilt admirer about the Kansas Quilt Trail, they thought it was a fabric store hop. No, I informed them. It’s a trail of painted wooden quilt blocks that are hung on barns, homes, businesses or fences along highways and streets in Kansas. The map is given online–but it’s just a general guideline to finding them. You may drive past a few undetected, trust me.

Just so you know, the portion we drove past and photographed is just a small portion. I have quite a few in my stash I’m happy to say, so please understand I’ll be sharing these for awhile on the Thursday Doors posts–along with the doors discovered along the way, respectively.

Downtown Alma, you won our hearts with your Heart-of-America feel.

These curtains were pretty whimsical and I didn’t notice until we were parked. Made me chuckle and of course they Had to be inserted this week. Thanks Alma for the smiles.

We loved happening onto this set of historical buildings. Other than the signage, I didn’t find any extra information on them. But I dearly love the oval window in the millinery shop! Not sure how original it is to the building but it fits perfectly in my opinion.

Block discovery.
Block discovery.

I wonder if they trade out blocks for holidays? This one is clearly in place for the July 4th weekend. Garage door included here. Looks like someone spends time grilling under that shade tree. Does a grill door count?

Bungalow with storm door
Bungalow with storm door

Clearly the caution tape is to prevent trespassing. I’d like to think they just got a new driveway entrance poured; but needless to say I didn’t plan on inquiring.

I hope you’ll come back next week for more quilt blocks and Thursday Doors. Also, please take time to visit our leader, Norm 2.0 for many more wonderful doors from all over!